Introduction

Just Forensic Anthropology and Forensic Pathology Portfolio

Just Forensic Anthropology and Forensic Pathology Portfolio

Original Release Date: June 18, 2021

In episode three of our 2021 NIJ R&D and Beyond mini season, Just Science sat down with Danielle McLeod-Henning, a physical scientist and program manager in the Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences at NIJ, to discuss Forensic Anthropology and Forensic Pathology.  

Danielle McLeod-Henning has been the physical scientist in charge of the forensic anthropology, pathology, and medicolegal death investigation portfolio since 2009. In that time, she has dedicated her efforts to bridging the gap between research and application. Listen along as she talks about technology translation, creating research connections outside of forensic science, and the NIJ research portfolio in this episode of Just Science.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Listen to or download the episode here:

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View or download the episode transcript here:
Transcript



Guest Biography

Danielle McLeod-Henning is a program manager/physical scientist in the Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences at the National Institute of Justice, US Department of Justice. She is responsible for managing projects in Forensic Science Research and Development, specifically in forensic anthropology, forensic pathology, crime scene examination, and related medicolegal death investigation fields. Ms. Mcleod-Henning holds a master's degree in forensic sciences from George Washington University and a bachelor's degree in anthropology from the Pennsylvania State University.


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