Introduction

Success Story: Demonstrating Objectivity in Ballistic Identification

Success Story: Demonstrating Objectivity in Ballistic Identification

National Institute of Justice and Intelligent Automation, Inc.

Date

April 2015

Overview

Firearms experts are seeking to strengthen their understanding of the accuracy and reliability of methods they use to associate fired ammunition recovered from a crime scene with a particular firearm. This is one of many studies to focus on expanding the scientific basis of firearms identification by developing quantifiable measures to help evaluate the evidence and explain the findings to a jury.

"The problem firearms examiners have had when testifying in court is that their conclusions are guided by experience and are difficult to quantify. With this and related studies, there is now a body of science that can help firearms examiners convince a jury of the accuracy of firearms identification for certain firearms barrels.”

- Benjamin Bachrach, Ph.D. | Intelligent Automation, Inc.


Funding for this Forensic Technology Center of Excellence success story was provided by the National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice.

The opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this success story are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Department of Justice.

Contact us at ForensicCOE@rti.org with any questions and subscribe to our newsletter for notifications.


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