Technical Note: Modifications to Capillary Microextraction in Volatiles (CMV) for the Extraction of Ignitable Liquid Residues (ILRs) 

Report Date

March 2020

Description

This report summarizes the development and implementation of a novel sampling device (capillary microextraction of volatiles [CMV]) invented in the Almirall research group at Florida International University for ILR extraction as an alternative to current techniques. The versatility of the CMV device has the potential for field sampling applications when coupled with portable analytical systems, and it has been successful in the following studies: sampling volatile compounds generated by explosives, detecting marijuana plants, detecting volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from amphetamines, analyzing breath samples, sampling organic gunshot residue (OGSR) VOCs, and sampling BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and the three xylene isomers) compounds in environmental studies. This report is intended for forensic practitioners who want to better understand newly developed technologies and their use and application to forensic casework.

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Resources

 

Success Story: NIJ and Jensen Hughes: Advancing the
Forensic Analysis of Ignitable Liquid Fuel Fires.

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Fire Debris Analysis is Not Black Magic!

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TECHNICAL NOTE: Detection of Organic Gunshot Residue
Using Capillary Microextraction of Volatiles with Cyrofocusing

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Jeri Ropero-Miller and Paul Speaker

 

Report Date

Volume 1, 2019, Pages 227-238

Abstract

The November 2017 release of the Council of Economic Advisers’ White House report on the opioid crisis suggests that prior consideration of expenses severely underestimated the economic costs of the opioid crisis. When corrected for these losses, the annual cost from the opioid crisis leapt nearly 600%. The cost to the criminal justice system was estimated at $8 Billion of which $270 million is borne by crime laboratories. However, laboratory budgets have not grown at a rate capable of meeting this increased demand for forensic science services. The hidden costs of the opioid crisis borne by the forensic crime laboratories comes as funds are diverted in the laboratory to meet the increased demands for services in drug chemistry and toxicology. Dramatic increases in turnaround times across other areas of investigation continue to grow as the crisis accelerates.

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This report was published in RTI Press, a global publisher of peer-reviewed, open-access publications on a broad range of topics. The areas of focus reflect RTI’s multidisciplinary research, our expertise in social and laboratory sciences, and our extensive international activities. Since 2008, the RTI Press has produced more than 100 publications.

Report Date

February 2019

Abstract

The 2019 National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Forensic Science Research and Development (R&D) Symposium is intended to promote collaboration and enhance knowledge transfer of NIJ-funded research. The NIJ Forensic Science R&D Program funds both basic or applied R&D projects that will (1) increase the body of knowledge to guide and inform forensic science policy and practice or (2) result in the production of useful materials, devices, systems, or methods that have the potential for forensic application. The intent of this program is to direct the findings of basic scientific research; research and development in broader scientific fields applicable to forensic science; and ongoing forensic science research toward the development of highly discriminating, accurate, reliable, cost-effective, and rapid methods for the identification, analysis, and interpretation of physical evidence for criminal justice purposes.

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NIJ and Florida International University

Report Date

April 2019

Impact

“I’m impressed with the potential for replacement wet color tests. The multiplexing capabilities have potential to address the challenges field forensics investigators encounter with non-pure, intermixed drugs as well as unknown powders.” —Dr. Michael Buerger, PhD, Professor of Criminal Justice, Bowling Green State University, and former New Hampshire police officer

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Links

McCord Laboratory

FTCOE Webinar: Paper Microfluidic Devices for Fieldable Forensic Testing

TEDx talk

This report was published in RTI Press, a global publisher of peer-reviewed, open-access publications on a broad range of topics. The areas of focus reflect RTI’s multidisciplinary research, our expertise in social and laboratory sciences, and our extensive international activities. Since 2008, the RTI Press has produced more than 100 publications.

Report Date

May 2018

Abstract

From January 22 to 25, 2018, RTI International, the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and the Forensic Technology Center of Excellence (FTCoE) held the 2018 Impression, Pattern and Trace Evidence Symposium (IPTES) in Arlington, VA, to promote collaboration, enhance knowledge transfer, and share best practices and policies for the impression, pattern, and trace evidence forensic science communities.

NIJ and FTCoE are committed to improving the practice of forensic science and strengthening its impact through support of research and development, rigorous technology evaluation and adoption, effective knowledge transfer and education, and comprehensive dissemination of best practices and guidelines to agencies dedicated to combating crime. The future of forensic sciences and its contribution to the public and criminal justice community is a motivating topic to gather expertise in a forum to discuss, learn, and share ideas. It’s about becoming part of an essential and historic movement as the forensic sciences continue to advance. The IPTES was specifically designed to bring together practitioners and researchers to enhance information-sharing and promote collaboration among the impression, pattern, and trace evidence analysts, law enforcement, and legal communities.

The IPTES was designed to bring together practitioners and researchers to enhance information sharing and promote collaboration among impression, pattern, and trace evidence analysts, law enforcement, and legal communities. This set of proceedings comprises abstracts from workshops, general sessions, breakout sessions, and poster presentations.

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About the Editor

Nicole S. Jones, MS, is the associate director of strategic planning and operations in the Center for Forensic Sciences (CFS) at RTI International.

This report was published in RTI Press, a global publisher of peer-reviewed, open-access publications on a broad range of topics. The areas of focus reflect RTI’s multidisciplinary research, our expertise in social and laboratory sciences, and our extensive international activities. Since 2008, the RTI Press has produced more than 100 publications.

Report Date

April 2018

Abstract

The 2018 National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Forensic Science Research and Development (R&D) Symposium is intended to promote collaboration and enhance knowledge transfer of NIJ-funded research. The NIJ Forensic Science R&D Program funds both basic or applied R&D projects that will (1) increase the body of knowledge to guide and inform forensic science policy and practice or (2) result in the production of useful materials, devices, systems, or methods that have the potential for forensic application.The intent of this program is to direct the findings of basic scientific research; research and development in broader scientific fields applicable to forensic science; and ongoing forensic science research toward the development of highly discriminating, accurate, reliable, cost-effective, and rapid methods for the identification, analysis, and interpretation of physical evidence for criminal justice purposes.

Click here to read the full report

About the Editor

Nicole S. Jones, MS, is the associate director of strategic planning and operations in the Center for Forensic Sciences (CFS) at RTI International.

REPORT DATE

April 2018

REPORT SUMMARY

Trace evidence represents any small-scale material that could be changed or transferred from a person, object, or environment during the commission of a crime; wood examination is one specialty area of this forensic discipline. The purpose of this workshop was to provide scientists with little or no experience in forensic wood identification an overview of the topic. This workshop included lectures on the macroscopic and microscopic features that are useful for discrimination/classification, sample preparation techniques, and hands-on exercises. Read the in-brief to learn more about this workshop.

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REPORT DATE

April 2018

REPORT SUMMARY

Polarized light microscopy (PLM) is a technique commonly used in the field of forensic science. PLM characterizes and identifies trace evidence found at crime scenes, such as fibers, hairs, paints, and glass fragments. This workshop introduced attendees to the theory and applications of PLM utilizing a combination of lecture and laboratory activities. Topics included proper microscope setup, refractive index measurement, basic optical crystallography, retardation and birefringence, extinction characteristics, and compensators. Read the in-brief to learn more about this workshop.

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Report Date

January 2018

Report Summary

The goal of this report is to provide the reader with a basic understanding of alternate light sources (ALS), as well as their use, benefits, and limitations. The information contained herein is derived from current literature and interviews with both users and technology developers, providing a thorough assessment of the considerations that will impact procurement, training, and use of ALS. This report also contains product tables highlighting the variety of ALS devices available for purchase.

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