Just Coroners Versus Medical Examiner Systems

In the second episode of our medicolegal death investigation special release season, Just Science interviews John Fudenberg, the Coroner for Clark County, Nevada. Listen along as Just Science explores commonalities and differences between the coroner and medical examiner systems to highlight pervading issues and possible improvements within the MDI community.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

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John Fudenberg is the Coroner for The Clark County Office of the Coroner/Medical Examiner (CCOCME) and has been with the office since 2003. Mr. Fudenberg brings twenty-five plus years of law enforcement and public service experience to the position, working in Anoka County MN and for the City of Las Vegas, in Las Vegas, Nevada prior to continuing his career with Clark County. John is a Diplomat with the American Board of Medicolegal Death Investigators (ABMDI). He is the past president of the International Association of Coroners & Medical Examiners (IAC&ME) Board of Directors, and is the Secretary of the IAC&ME. John is also a past commissioner of the National Commission on Forensic Science (NCFS). John serves on the National Institute of Standards & Technology Organization of Scientific Area Committee (NIST OSAC), as well as Chairman of the Las Vegas Trauma Intervention Program (TIP).


Additional Resources:

Coroner Versus Medical Examiner Systems: Can We End the Debate?

2018 IAC&ME TRAINING SYMPOSIUM

Report: 2018 Medicolegal Death Investigation Stakeholders’ Meeting

MDI & Pathology Resources 

Other Related Podcasts:

Just a Whole-Body CT Image Database

Just the State of Pathology

Just Being Vocal About Vicarious Trauma 

REPORT DATE

April 2018

REPORT SUMMARY

The Defense Forensic Science Center (DFSC) developed FRStat in response to criticisms from legal and scientific commentators on the lack of an empirically demonstrable basis to substantiate conclusions in pattern evidence. This tool is intended to provide a statistical estimate of the strength of evidence to be used in conjunction with the examiner’s own conclusion. This workshop covered basic statistical concepts, interpretation and reporting of FRStat results, limitations, considerations for use, and implementation suggestions.  Read the in-brief to learn more about this workshop.

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This report was published in RTI Press, a global publisher of peer-reviewed, open-access publications on a broad range of topics. The areas of focus reflect RTI’s multidisciplinary research, our expertise in social and laboratory sciences, and our extensive international activities. Since 2008, the RTI Press has produced more than 100 publications.

Report Date

June 2017

Abstract

The 2017 National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Forensic Science Research and Development (R&D) Symposium is intended to promote collaboration and enhance knowledge transfer of NIJ-funded research. The NIJ Forensic Science R&D Program funds both basic or applied R&D projects that will (1) increase the body of knowledge to guide and inform forensic science policy and practice or (2) result in the production of useful materials, devices, systems, or methods that have the potential for forensic application. The intent of this program is to direct the findings of basic scientific research; research and development in broader scientific fields applicable to forensic science; and ongoing forensic science research toward the development of highly discriminating, accurate, reliable, cost-effective, and rapid methods for the identification, analysis, and interpretation of physical evidence for criminal justice purposes.

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About the Authors

Nicole Suzanne McCleary, MS, is the associate director of strategic planning and operations in the Center for Forensic Sciences (CFS) at RTI International.

Gerald LaPorte, MSFS, is a supervisory physical scientist and director of the Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences at the National Institute of Justice.

 

This report was published in RTI Press, a global publisher of peer-reviewed, open-access publications on a broad range of topics. The areas of focus reflect RTI’s multidisciplinary research, our expertise in social and laboratory sciences, and our extensive international activities. Since 2008, the RTI Press has produced more than 100 publications. 

Report Date

July 2016


Report Summary

The 2016 NIJ Research and Development Symposium is intended to promote collaboration and enhance knowledge transfer of NIJ-funded research. The NIJ Research and Development (R&D) Program funds both basic or applied R&D projects that will (1) increase the body of knowledge to guide and inform forensic science policy and practice, or (2) result in the production of useful materials, devices, systems, or methods that have the potential for forensic application. The intent of this program is to direct the findings of basic scientific research; research and development in broader scientific fields applicable to forensic science; and ongoing forensic science research toward the development of highly discriminating, accurate, reliable, cost-effective, and rapid methods for the identification, analysis, and interpretation of physical evidence for criminal justice purposes. NIJ and the Forensic Technology Center of Excellence are committed to improving the practice of forensic science and strengthening its impact through support of R&D, rigorous technology evaluation and adoption, effective knowledge transfer and education, and comprehensive dissemination of best practices and guidelines to agencies dedicated to combating crime.

Click here to read the full report


About the Authors

 

Nicole Suzanne McCleary, MS, is the associate director of strategic planning and operations in the Center for Forensic Sciences (CFS) at RTI International.

Gerald LaPorte, MSFS, is a supervisory physical scientist and director of the Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences at the National Institute of Justice.

 

This report was published in RTI Press, a global publisher of peer-reviewed, open-access publications on a broad range of topics. The areas of focus reflect RTI’s multidisciplinary research, our expertise in social and laboratory sciences, and our extensive international activities. Since 2008, the RTI Press has produced more than 100 publications.

Report Date

December 2015


Report Summary

RTI International, the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), and the Forensic Technology Center of Excellence (FTCoE) present the proceedings from the 2015 Impression, Pattern, and Trace Evidence Symposium (IPTES). The IPTES was held August 25–27 in San Antonio, Texas, as the first joint symposium to promote collaboration, enhance knowledge transfer, and share best practices and policies for the impression, pattern, and trace evidence forensic science communities. This symposium convened practitioners and researchers to promote information-sharing and collaboration among the law enforcement, legal, and impression, pattern, and trace evidence communities. During this 3-day event, leading experts in their respective fields presented to an audience of nearly 600 attendees. The presentations focused on topics that included the latest developments and novel approaches to fingerprint, shoeprint, and tire tread evidence; questioned documents; bloodstain pattern analysis; biometrics; firearms/toolmarks; digital photography; and fibers, paint, tape, and other types of evidence as well as addressing error rates, testimony, interpretation/reporting, case studies, and technology applications. The proceedings include author information, abstracts, keywords, and type of presentation.

Click here to read the full report


About the Editors

 

Jeri Ropero-Miller, PhD, is a principal investigator (PI) and Senior Research Forensic Scientist in RTI International’s Center for Forensic Sciences. She is a board-certified forensic toxicologist with Fellow status on the American Board of Forensic Toxicology (F-ABFT). She has more than 20 years of experience conducting research, training, technology transfer, and evaluations in forensic science and criminal justice.

Crystal M. Daye, MPA, is a Research Associate in RTI’s Center for Justice, Safety and Resilience. Through the Center’s Policing, Security, and Investigative Science Program, she’s worked on a number of projects focused on emerging topics in law enforcement strategies and operations and forensics.

Heidi Eldridge, MS, is a Research Forensic Scientist in the Center for Forensic Sciences at RTI. Ms. Eldridge has over 11 years’ experience in forensic science in the domains of latent prints, crime scene analysis and reconstruction, and controlled substances.

Report Date

January 2014


Report Summary

This report provides a “landscape” view of the issues and products associated with mobile devices for fingerprint identification, with a focus on forensic applications. The document is intended to furnish laboratory managers and investigators with a survey of current commercially available products. In addition, the report provides decision makers and potential end users with use examples that illustrate successful adoption; issues to consider related to implementation of mobile ID devices; and a snapshot of current mobile ID technologies. Upon review, the reader may better understand whether mobile ID devices can benefit his or her organization and how to proceed with selecting a platform and implementing use.

For additional information, check out the article “Insight into Mobile ID Fingerprint Technology” in the July/August issue of TechBeat. Click here to access the article.

Click here to read the full report