Description

Drowning is one of the leading causes of “accidental death” in the United States, but it is possible that many of these deaths are, in fact, incidents of foul play. It is important that law enforcement personnel learn how to properly investigate an underwater scene and preserve the evidence.

This course, hosted by the Longmont Department of Public Safety and Team Lifeguard Systems on October 4-6, 2017, detailed the procedures and tactics for dealing with aquatic death and drowning investigations. The FTCoE funded two practitioners to attend this training to better understand the proper procedures to use during an aquatic death investigation. Read the FTCoE’s in-brief, published February 2018, to learn more about this event.

 

Objectives

During this class, attendees learned about topics including, but not limited to:

– Proper documentation of aquatic death scenes
– Preservation of possible water crime scenes
– Bathtub, bucket, toilet, pool, and openwater incidents
– Indications of homicides by drowning
– Autoerotic aquatic asphyxia and aquatic sexual sadism

This report was published in RTI Press, a global publisher of peer-reviewed, open-access publications on a broad range of topics. The areas of focus reflect RTI’s multidisciplinary research, our expertise in social and laboratory sciences, and our extensive international activities. Since 2008, the RTI Press has produced more than 100 publications.

Report Date

September 2017

Abstract

On May 10–11, 2016, the US Department of Justice (DOJ) National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the Netherlands Forensic Institute (NFI; Dutch Ministry of Security and Justice of the Netherlands), the International Society for Forensic Radiology and Imaging (ISFRI), the International Association of Forensic Radiographers (IAFR), and NIJ’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence (FTCoE) at RTI International organized and convened the International Forensic Radiology Research Summit (IFRRS) at the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam. The summit assembled 40 international subject matter experts in forensic radiology, to include researchers, practitioners, government employees, and professional staff from 14 countries. The goal of this 2-day summit was to identify gaps, challenges, and research needs to produce a road map to success regarding the state of forensic radiology, including formulating a plan to address the obstacles to implementation of advanced imaging technologies in medicolegal investigations. These proceedings summarize the meeting’s important exchange of technical and operational information, ideas, and solutions for the community and other stakeholders of forensic radiology.

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About the Editors

Nicole S. Jones, MS, is the associate director of strategic planning and operations in the Center for Forensic Sciences (CFS) at RTI International.

Jeri Ropero-Miller, PhD, is a principal investigator (PI) and Senior Research Forensic Scientist in the Center for Forensic Sciences (CFS) at RTI International.

NIJ and the American Registry of Pathology

Report Date

April 2018

Impact

“The complete mtGenome reference data developed in this project serve as important milestones for the understanding of coding region heteroplasmy and the acceptance of full mtGenome sequencing in worldwide forensic genetics.” -Dr. Walther Parson, Co-PI and Associate Professor, Institute of Legal Medicine, Innsbruck Medical University

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Links

EMPOP

GenBank

AFDIL

NIJ and Multi-Institute Academic Team

Report Date

April 2018

Impact

“This research clearly demonstrated that there is potential to develop microbiome tools for estimating time of death. Developing connections with the right interdisciplinary collaborators was instrumental to the success of this project.” -Jessica Metcalf, Assistant Professor, Colorado State University

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Report Date

February 2018

Description

Drowning is one of the leading causes of “accidental death” in the United States, but it is possible that many of these deaths are, in fact, incidents of foul play. It is important that law enforcement personnel learn how to properly investigate an underwater scene and preserve the evidence. This course, hosted by the Longmont Department of Public Safety and Team LGS, detailed the procedures and tactics for dealing with aquatic death and drowning investigations. The FTCoE funded two practitioners to attend this training to better understand the proper procedures to use during an aquatic death investigation. Read the in-brief to learn more about this event.

This report was published in RTI Press, a global publisher of peer-reviewed, open-access publications on a broad range of topics. The areas of focus reflect RTI’s multidisciplinary research, our expertise in social and laboratory sciences, and our extensive international activities. Since 2008, the RTI Press has produced more than 100 publications.

Report Date

June 2017

Abstract

The 2017 National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Forensic Science Research and Development (R&D) Symposium is intended to promote collaboration and enhance knowledge transfer of NIJ-funded research. The NIJ Forensic Science R&D Program funds both basic or applied R&D projects that will (1) increase the body of knowledge to guide and inform forensic science policy and practice or (2) result in the production of useful materials, devices, systems, or methods that have the potential for forensic application. The intent of this program is to direct the findings of basic scientific research; research and development in broader scientific fields applicable to forensic science; and ongoing forensic science research toward the development of highly discriminating, accurate, reliable, cost-effective, and rapid methods for the identification, analysis, and interpretation of physical evidence for criminal justice purposes.

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About the Authors

Nicole Suzanne McCleary, MS, is the associate director of strategic planning and operations in the Center for Forensic Sciences (CFS) at RTI International.

Gerald LaPorte, MSFS, is a supervisory physical scientist and director of the Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences at the National Institute of Justice.

 

This report was published in RTI Press, a global publisher of peer-reviewed, open-access publications on a broad range of topics. The areas of focus reflect RTI’s multidisciplinary research, our expertise in social and laboratory sciences, and our extensive international activities. Since 2008, the RTI Press has produced more than 100 publications. 

Report Date

July 2016


Report Summary

The 2016 NIJ Research and Development Symposium is intended to promote collaboration and enhance knowledge transfer of NIJ-funded research. The NIJ Research and Development (R&D) Program funds both basic or applied R&D projects that will (1) increase the body of knowledge to guide and inform forensic science policy and practice, or (2) result in the production of useful materials, devices, systems, or methods that have the potential for forensic application. The intent of this program is to direct the findings of basic scientific research; research and development in broader scientific fields applicable to forensic science; and ongoing forensic science research toward the development of highly discriminating, accurate, reliable, cost-effective, and rapid methods for the identification, analysis, and interpretation of physical evidence for criminal justice purposes. NIJ and the Forensic Technology Center of Excellence are committed to improving the practice of forensic science and strengthening its impact through support of R&D, rigorous technology evaluation and adoption, effective knowledge transfer and education, and comprehensive dissemination of best practices and guidelines to agencies dedicated to combating crime.

Click here to read the full report


About the Authors

 

Nicole Suzanne McCleary, MS, is the associate director of strategic planning and operations in the Center for Forensic Sciences (CFS) at RTI International.

Gerald LaPorte, MSFS, is a supervisory physical scientist and director of the Office of Investigative and Forensic Sciences at the National Institute of Justice.