Report Series Update

January 2019

Report Series Summary

Over the past decade, several tools have been developed to increase organizational efficiency and reduce backlogs, including process mapping and Lean Six Sigma (LSS). In 2011, a variation of LSS, named Lean Design was introduced as a novel approach to health facility design (Mersereau & Jimmerson, 2011). While the Lean Design approach has been successfully implemented in a number of health care research and development and quality management laboratories, it has not yet been applied to the planning and construction of forensic facilities.


Conducting a Forensic Facility Needs Assessment Using Lean Facility Design: A Case Example

January 2019

Report Summary
This report details the steps for using a lean facility design (LFD) approach to conduct a needs assessment in a forensic facility. LFD is a strategy that is used to optimize the flow of information, work, and people through a facility. In addition to detailing the steps for conducting an LFD assessment, this report also provides a short case example. The National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence (FTCoE) collaborated with the Midwest Forensics Resource Center (MFRC) to conduct an LFD needs assessment at the Broward County Sheriff’s Office (BSO), in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

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Development of a Lean Facility Design Roadmap for Design-Bid-Build Forensic Facilities

January 2016

Report Summary
In an effort to incorporate Lean Design thinking into the planning, construction, and relocation of forensic facilities, the National Institute of Justice’s FTCoE initiated a project to develop guidelines and checklists for Lean Facility Design (LFD). This document reports on the development of these LFD guidelines and checklists and their integration with the guidance in the White Book to develop an LFD roadmap for planning and constructing 21st century Design-Bid-Build forensic facilities.

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Other Resources

Forensic Science Laboratories: Handbook for Facility Planning, Design, Construction and Relocation (2013)

In 2013, NIST published an update to its widely acclaimed Forensic Science Laboratories: Handbook for Facility Planning, Design, Construction and Relocation. The “White Book,” as it is often called, was developed by a group of 16 professionals with expertise in laboratory management, planning, architecture, and engineering. It offers advice for law enforcement agencies on 21st century planning, design, construction of, and relocation to, publicly funded forensic facilities. Click here to read the full report.

This report was published in RTI Press, a global publisher of peer-reviewed, open-access publications on a broad range of topics. The areas of focus reflect RTI’s multidisciplinary research, our expertise in social and laboratory sciences, and our extensive international activities. Since 2008, the RTI Press has produced more than 100 publications.

Report Date

September 2017

Abstract

On May 10–11, 2016, the US Department of Justice (DOJ) National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the Netherlands Forensic Institute (NFI; Dutch Ministry of Security and Justice of the Netherlands), the International Society for Forensic Radiology and Imaging (ISFRI), the International Association of Forensic Radiographers (IAFR), and NIJ’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence (FTCoE) at RTI International organized and convened the International Forensic Radiology Research Summit (IFRRS) at the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam. The summit assembled 40 international subject matter experts in forensic radiology, to include researchers, practitioners, government employees, and professional staff from 14 countries. The goal of this 2-day summit was to identify gaps, challenges, and research needs to produce a road map to success regarding the state of forensic radiology, including formulating a plan to address the obstacles to implementation of advanced imaging technologies in medicolegal investigations. These proceedings summarize the meeting’s important exchange of technical and operational information, ideas, and solutions for the community and other stakeholders of forensic radiology.

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About the Editors

Nicole S. Jones, MS, is the associate director of strategic planning and operations in the Center for Forensic Sciences (CFS) at RTI International.

Jeri Ropero-Miller, PhD, is a principal investigator (PI) and Senior Research Forensic Scientist in the Center for Forensic Sciences (CFS) at RTI International.

This report was published in RTI Press, a global publisher of peer-reviewed, open-access publications on a broad range of topics. The areas of focus reflect RTI’s multidisciplinary research, our expertise in social and laboratory sciences, and our extensive international activities. Since 2008, the RTI Press has produced more than 100 publications.

Report Date

December 2015


Report Summary

RTI International, the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), and the Forensic Technology Center of Excellence (FTCoE) present the proceedings from the 2015 Impression, Pattern, and Trace Evidence Symposium (IPTES). The IPTES was held August 25–27 in San Antonio, Texas, as the first joint symposium to promote collaboration, enhance knowledge transfer, and share best practices and policies for the impression, pattern, and trace evidence forensic science communities. This symposium convened practitioners and researchers to promote information-sharing and collaboration among the law enforcement, legal, and impression, pattern, and trace evidence communities. During this 3-day event, leading experts in their respective fields presented to an audience of nearly 600 attendees. The presentations focused on topics that included the latest developments and novel approaches to fingerprint, shoeprint, and tire tread evidence; questioned documents; bloodstain pattern analysis; biometrics; firearms/toolmarks; digital photography; and fibers, paint, tape, and other types of evidence as well as addressing error rates, testimony, interpretation/reporting, case studies, and technology applications. The proceedings include author information, abstracts, keywords, and type of presentation.

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About the Editors

 

Jeri Ropero-Miller, PhD, is a principal investigator (PI) and Senior Research Forensic Scientist in RTI International’s Center for Forensic Sciences. She is a board-certified forensic toxicologist with Fellow status on the American Board of Forensic Toxicology (F-ABFT). She has more than 20 years of experience conducting research, training, technology transfer, and evaluations in forensic science and criminal justice.

Crystal M. Daye, MPA, is a Research Associate in RTI’s Center for Justice, Safety and Resilience. Through the Center’s Policing, Security, and Investigative Science Program, she’s worked on a number of projects focused on emerging topics in law enforcement strategies and operations and forensics.

Heidi Eldridge, MS, is a Research Forensic Scientist in the Center for Forensic Sciences at RTI. Ms. Eldridge has over 11 years’ experience in forensic science in the domains of latent prints, crime scene analysis and reconstruction, and controlled substances.

Report Date

December 2016


Purpose

This report provides a landscape of select mobile evidential breath alcohol instruments and factors impacting their implementation and use. Specifically, this report provides decision-makers and potential end users with the following: 1) an overview of the technology and federal/state requirements 2) exemplary situations that illustrate successful adoption 3) lessons learned and key considerations for mobile instrument implementation 4) comparisons of the capabilities of commercially available breath alcohol instruments.


Report Summary

The goal of this report is to provide the reader with a basic understanding of mobile evidential breath alcohol instruments, as well as their use, benefits, and limitations. The information contained herein is derived from current literature and interviews with both users and technology developers, providing a thorough assessment of the considerations that will impact procurement, training, fielding, and use of mobile evidential breath alcohol instruments. This report also provides suggested methodologies for incorporating a mobile breath alcohol instrument workflow to help establish best practices for investigating alcohol-related driving incidents.

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Report Date

November 2014


Participants

Various researchers, Federal stakeholders, and practitioners from the SANE/SAFE/SART community.


Report Summary

At the request of the National Institute of Justice, the Forensic Technology Center of Excellence (FTCoE) leads a comprehensive federal effort to organize and transfer knowledge and best practices of sexual assault nurse examiners, sexual assault forensic examiners, and collaborative sexual assault response teams (SANE/SAFE/SART). This FTCoE effort focuses on systemic challenges that impede the investigation of criminal sexual assaults in the United States, with goals that include creating an awareness of resources and ensuring that existing research, information, knowledge, and best practices are available and accessible to SANE/SAFE/SART and other practitioners who contribute to the nation’s response to sexual assault. This report presents recommendations and strategies which were derived from a three phase process including; a comprehensive literature review, a Federal stakeholder meeting, and a sexual assault practitioner stakeholder meeting and presented in a policy forum.

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