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In episode three of the Improving the System season, Just Science interviews John Paul Jones and Mark Stolorow of NIST about the Organization of Scientific Area Committees for Forensic Science. The 2009 National Academy of Sciences report on forensic science cited a lack of national leadership and scientifically sound standards. Its authors specifically looked to NIST to bridge these gaps in the forensic science arena. Listen along as our guests from NIST discuss developing standards and the creation of the Organization of Scientific Area Committees for Forensic Science.  

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

 

 

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Mark Stolorow is the Director of OSAC Affairs at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD. He was the coordinator for forensic biology and research program administrator for the Illinois State Police Bureau of Forensic Science, and the executive director of Orchid Cellmark, a forensic DNA testing laboratory. He has a B.S. from the University of Michigan, an M.S. in Forensic Chemistry from the University of Pittsburgh, and an M.B.A. from Eastern Michigan University.

John Paul Jones II is the Associate Director of OSAC Affairs within the Forensic Science Program at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).  The Organization of Scientific Area Committees (OSAC) for Forensic Science is composed of 34 operating units populated by over 560 members and over 250 affiliates.  It provides the national infrastructure for identifying, generating and adopting technically sound forensic science standards and guidelines for the forensic industry.  Mr. Jones has more than 18 years of scientific and management experience in the forensic industry including positions in the private sector, U.S. Department of Justice and Department of Defense.   He received his bachelor’s degree in biochemistry from Virginia Tech and a master’s of business administration from Carnegie Mellon University.

 


Additional Resources:

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Organization of Scientific Area Committees (OSAC)