Introduction

Humanitarian and Human Rights Resource Center Virtual Library 2024

Humanitarian and Human Rights Resource Center Virtual Library 2024

← Back to the HHRRC Special Initiative

The Humanitarian and Human Rights Resource Center (HHRRC), an organization within the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS) supported by the National Institute of Justice's (NIJ's) Forensic Technology Center of Excellence (FTCOE), hosted an in-person poster session where attendees had the opportunity to meet HHRRC researchers and learn about the application of contemporary forensic science and forensic medicine principles to global humanitarian or human rights projects requiring special forensic assistance.

This in-person poster session was hosted at the 76th Annual AAFS Scientific Conference in Denver, Colorado and attendance required conference registration. A selection of digital PDF posters along with short audio/video presentations from HHRRC poster session participants are accessible below and will remain archived on the website as a virtual library for future viewing purposes. 

Poster Session Details

In-Person Details

Date
Tuesday, February 20, 2024
6:00pm - 8:00pm MST

Location
Room: 301
76th Annual AAFS Scientific Conference, Colorado Convention Center, Denver, Colorado 
*Attendance requires conference registration.

Virtual Details

Date
Tuesday, February 20, 2024
Materials will become available at 6:00pm MST.

Location
Digital PDF posters along with short audio/video presentations from HHRRC poster session participants will be made accessible below and will remain archived on the website as a virtual library for future viewing purposes. 

Poster Presentations

Click on the poster title below to jump to that presentation. An asterisk (*) denotes the lead author.

POSTER 1
Assessment of Capacity Building for Humanitarian Ethics in Forensic Investigation, Reporting, and Research Publication Dealing with Cadavers in the Indian Context

Authors: Mohammad Nasir Ahmad* & Vina Vaswani

POSTER 2
“They Are Our Parents” – Applications of Forensic Anthropology in Identifying Victims of Operation Condor in Paraguay

Authors: Katelyn L. Bolhofner*, Adriana Sartorio, & Rogelio Goiburú

POSTER 3
Hair and Natural Textiles as Detectors for Chlorine Gas Exposure

Authors: Jack Hietpas*, Ethan Groves, Skip Palenik, & Christopher S. Palenik

POSTER 1
Assessment of Capacity Building for Humanitarian Ethics in Forensic Investigation, Reporting, and Research Publication Dealing with Cadavers in the Indian Context
Mohammad Nasir Ahmad* & Vina Vaswani

ABSTRACT

Professional, ethical approaches and humanitarian forensics are in the infancy stage in India. Forensic professionals in this context feel that there is an urgent need to raise awareness of this issue. With the support of the Humanitarian and Human Rights Resource Center Grant, the presenters conducted a few capacity-building training programs where collaborators learned how to mitigate ethical issues relating to cadavers from a humanitarian forensics lens. The programs helped spread the roots of humanitarian forensics and an ethical approach to dealing with cadavers.

POSTER 2
“They Are Our Parents” – Applications of Forensic Anthropology in Identifying Victims of Operation Condor in Paraguay
Katelyn L. Bolhofner*, Adriana Sartorio, & Rogelio Goiburú

Double click to view video full screen.

ABSTRACT

In 1975, dictatorships in the Southern Cone of South America began a campaign of political repressionOperation Condorresulting in thousands of “disappeared” individuals. This presentation provides an update on efforts to aid the Historical Memory Department, Paraguay, in identifying remains from a clandestine mass grave associated with Operation Condor.

POSTER 3
Hair and Natural Textiles as Detectors for Chlorine Gas Exposure
Jack Hietpas*, Ethan Groves, Skip Palenik, & Christopher S. Palenik

ABSTRACT

This project explores a novel method for assessing the exposure of people and their clothing to chlorine gas, a resurgent chemical warfare agent. The research examines changes to the micro-structure of human hair and natural textile fibers that occur as a result of chlorine dosage (exposure time and concentration of chlorine gas). A suite of microscopical and microanalytical methods have been explored to examine and characterize exposed hair and fibers.


Funding for this Forensic Technology Center of Excellence event was provided by the National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice.

The opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this event are those of the presenter(s) and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Department of Justice.

Contact us at ForensicCOE@rti.org with any questions and subscribe to our newsletter for notifications.


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