Driving forensic research to practice is a community effort. Support from practitioners, vendors, and other stakeholders help researchers develop value-adding innovation. Please consider how you may be able to assist NIJ grantees with specific needs to advance their work.

Partnerships between laboratories and researchers help drive new technologies and processes into practice. Additional resources to connect to partners include:

NIJ’s “Connecting Researchers with Forensic Laboratories” Page: this is a list of forensic laboratories who are open to working with forensic research grantees. If you are an operational forensic laboratory who is interested in connecting with and supporting researchers, please contact grants@ncjrs.gov to be added to the list.

The Laboratories and Educators Alliance Program (LEAP) is a joint effort between the American Society of Crime Lab Directors (ASCLD) and the Council of Forensic Science Educators (COFSE). The goal of this effort is to facilitate collaborative research between academia and forensic science laboratories. Please check the LEAP map for participating universities and forensic laboratories, or to add yourself to the list.

GrantAffiliationDisciplineNeedContact
2017-DN-BX-0164/2019-DU-BX-0023George Washington UniversityDNASeeking to connect with different academic and industry stakeholders to gain consensus on their needs, requirements, and decision making parameters for several technological aspects of a DNA diagnostic kit.lblume@rti.org
2013-DN-BX-K033Virginia Commonwealth UniversityDNASeeking to connect and form strategic partnerships and alliances with interested agencies and/or crime labs to help fine-tune the pre-commercial development of a DNA mixture analysis test kit.lblume@rti.org
2015-MU-MU-K026Virginia Commonwealth UniversityDNASearching for accredited forensic labs, working on fingerprint and touch samples analysis, to re-validate a novel DNA mixture assay kit using ABI’s new quant Studio qPCR platformlblume@rti.org
2017-NE-BX-0004Stanford UniversityDNASeeking development partners to advance prototype for novel oligosaccharide Sialyl‐ LewisX (SLeX) technology that binds specifically to sperm, separates non-sperm contents, and takes images on a portable cellphone-integrated imaging platform.   rsatcher@rti.org
2017-NE-BX-0007InnogenomicsDNASeeking external validation partners to confirm robustness of novel polymer filter technology that separates sperm cells from sexual assault samples.rsatcher@rti.org
2017-R2-CX-0019Sam Houston State UniversityToxicologySeeking samples from laboratory to test for synthetic opioids in oral fluid. Her method of obtaining samples from sensitive populations such as arrestees and prison populations has been impacted by COVID-19.rshute@rti.org
2019-DU-BX-0019Montana State University Crime Scene InvestigationSeeking video and audio data from past crime investigations to help “train” a model of an audio forensics tool, especially video and audio recordings of the same forensic incident. awitsil@rti.org

 

The Humanitarian and Human Rights Resource Center of the American Academy of Forensic Science is supported in part by NIJ’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence. The HHRRC seeks to utilize the assets of the AAFS to promote the application of contemporary forensic science and forensic medicine principles to global humanitarian and/or human rights projects. Together with the new Chair of the HHRRC, Dr. Dawnie Steadman, the FTCoE invites you to learn more about the history and future of the HHRRC with the following video message.

For more about HHRRC’s work, visit their FTCoE page here.

As Dr. Steadman highlighted in the video message above, the inaugural Humanitarian and Human Rights Resource Center Poster and Networking Session was hosted at the 2020 AAFS Annual Scientific Meeting in Anaheim, CA. This session was an open meeting where over 200 attendees met HHRRC researchers to learn about the application of forensic science to investigate humanitarian and human rights injustices. The virtual poster session below showcases materials and posters from that event.

 

We are thrilled to offer ABMDI Continuing Education Credits to those who attend the following virtual events.

ABMDI credits will be calculated by total time spent watching. For the best viewing experience, each individual session is designed to be watched in its entirety in one sitting.

Each session results in a certificate of completion. After you have completed a session and acquired your certificate, please contact info@abmdi.us with your certificate to apply for the ABMDI credits. If you experience any difficult accessing your certificates, please contact forensicCOE@rti.org.

We are unable to administer CE credit to users watching in groups. In order to receive your CE credits, you must be logged in to our learning ecosystem under your own name. If you are not logged in under your own name, you will not receive CE credits.

Learn more about ABMDI credits here.


Webinars

Cradle to Cane: Investigation of Crimes Against Vulnerable Victims
Credits: Up to 13.6 hours
Click here to learn more about this series and register.

Online Workshop: 2018 IAC&ME Training Symposium
Credits: Up to 5.5 hours
Click here to learn more about this series and register.

The Vicarious Trauma Toolkit – An Evidence-Informed Resource for Organizations
Credits: Up to 1.5 hours
Click here to learn more about this series and register.

2019 National Opioid and Emerging Drug Threats Policy and Practice Forum
Credits: Up to 10.8 hours
Click here to learn more about this series and register.

Medicolegal Death Investigation: Locating and Notifying Next of Kin & Donation 101
Credits: Up to 1.75
Click here to learn more about this series and register.

The Opioid Epidemic: An Update from the Coroner/ME Perspective
Credits: Up to .83
Click here to learn more about this series and register.

Overview

The FTCOE has worked with the American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors (ASCLD) to promote and support universal accreditation and to promote the value of forensic science accreditation, continuous improvement, succession planning and technical certifications.  In furtherance of these priorities, an ASCLD Domestic Accreditation Taskforce, (ADATF) was established, and worked to partner with labs that have committed, through an agreement, to pursue accreditation within the upcoming year.  As part of this initiative, ASCLD and the FTCOE have built a toolkit to help laboratories achieve accreditation.

The Accreditation Initiative

The ASCLD Domestic Accreditation Taskforce, (ADATF) was established to partner with labs that have committed, through an agreement, to pursue accreditation. The ADATF is comprised of laboratory directors, quality assurance managers and technical subject matter experts that have been trained and certified as Assessors by an accrediting organization and have served in the role as an Assessor for an accreditation program. The ADATF is designed to work in a mentoring and advisory capacity with a laboratory as the laboratory takes critical steps to achieve International accreditation. This taskforce reports to the Board of Directors and the Executive Director who has general oversight of ASCLD initiatives. To learn more about this program visit the ASCLD imitative website at https://www.ascld.org/accreditation-initiative/.

Access the accreditation toolkit by clicking the button below.
Accreditation Toolkit

Additional Resources

Webinar Series:
ASCLD’s Train the Director
Podcast Episode:
DRUGS : Just Fentanyl Lab Fads with ASCLD

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Resources for Forensic Researchers

The NIJ’s investment in forensic science R&D advances new technologies that improve the objective collection, analysis, and interpretation of evidence. The NIJ supports a portfolio of grantees developing techniques, tools, and processes to advance forensic science. FTCoE works closely with these researchers to facilitate adoption and dissemination of these innovations.

• Do you need help applying your research to practice?

• Do you need help better connecting to forensic practitioners?

• Do you need a partner to help you develop the technology?

• Do you need real-world validation and testing partners?

The FTCoE leverages the robust technical expertise and connections of its staff as well as academic and industry partners to transition researchers’ work into the community and effectively “close the loop” from research to practice.  These advancements provide significant impact to the forensic community when they are implemented in casework, a process that challenges researchers to iterate, validate, and ultimately drive adoption of their solutions.

How Can We Support YOU?
The FTCoE supports NIJ-funded researchers by to:

Engage and inform stakeholders. The FTCoE participates in stakeholder meetings to understand needs and connect and engage the forensic innovation ecosystem. The FTCoE also highlights research, techniques, and opportunities for researchers to connect to the community.

Enable products and processes. The FTCoE performs in-field evaluation and validation studies so that researchers develop solutions that better meet end user  needs. The FTCoE also helps connect researchers to development partners and provides licensing and other commercialization support.

Promote the success of researchers. The FTCoE documents metrics and “success stories” of researchers positively impacting the forensic community with their work.

Check Out Our Resources
The FTCoE has developed resources specifically tailored to researchers developing forensic innovations. Consider how these resources may help you drive your research into practice. For more information on each resource, click on the titles below.

Education on Innovation and Technology Transfer

Transition to Impact Webinar: Learn the steps you can take to improve the likelihood of your research impacting practice, with input from three researchers who have successfully transitioned their technology into the community.
Innovation in Forensics: A Community Effort In-Brief: Read this summary about the path of technology transition, the roles of stakeholders within the forensic innovation ecosystem, and the FTCoE’s role in supporting technology transition.
The Researcher’s Role in Technology Transition In-Brief: The brief offers pathways and steps for successful transition of research into the forensic community.
NIJ R&D Portfolio Management and Technology Transition Support: This report documents the purpose and processes related to FTCoE’s support in transitioning NIJ’s R&D portfolio towards greater impact in forensic applications.

Resources for Forensic Innovators

A Landscape Study of Federal Investment in Forensic Science R&D: A detailed overview of sources of federal and foundation funding for forensic research.
Forensic Laboratory Needs Technology Working Group: The Forensic Laboratory Needs Technology Working Group (FLN-TWG), established by NIJ in 2018, provides a forum for forensic practitioners and researchers to develop coordinated approaches to addressing technology implementation challenges. The FLN-TWG goals are summarized in the report of their first meeting.
LEAP Program: The Laboratories and Educators Alliance Program is a partnership of the American Society of Crime Lab Directors (ASCLD) and the Council of Forensic Science Educators (CFSE), which provides partnership opportunities between universities and forensic labs.
NIJ Grantee Database: Contact FTCoE Customer Service (forensiccoe@rti.org) to get your credentials and update the status of your research.

Examples of NIJ Research Transitioning to the Community
The FTCoE promotes adoption of forensic technologies to the community through knowledge transfer activities, including the following:

NIJ R&D Symposium: Access the program, proceedings, and presentations from the annual NIJ Forensic Science Research and Development Symposium — an opportunity for NIJ-funded researchers to present their research across a variety of disciplines.
Emerging Forensic Research Webinar Series: Consider how this emerging research impacts you, or if you have research to highlight, contact us.
Success Stories: Learn from, and about these newly developed products and techniques resulting from NIJ-supported research.

Engage With Our Team:
If you have an NIJ-funded grant and are looking for help transitioning your technology, please contact the FTCoE at forensiccoe@rti.org.

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Description

The Humanitarian and Human Rights Resource Center (HHRRC) seeks to utilize the assets of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS) to promote the application of contemporary forensic science and forensic medicine principles to global humanitarian and/or human rights projects requiring special assistance. The Center is funded in part through the National Institute of Justice’s FTCoE.

HHRRC projects are those selected for support by the International Advisory Council of the HHRRC and can include research applied to humanitarian and human rights projects, training materials and equipment, and advising or subject matter expertise. The HHRRC also aims to provide support and encouragement to AAFS members to increase their engagement in applying contemporary forensic science to global humanitarian matters.

In addition to direct support for forensic studies, the HHRRC provides access to publications and educational materials to disseminate knowledge on the issues and application of contemporary forensic science and forensic medical principles. The HHRRC assists projects by making laboratory and analysis equipment available. To strengthen the available pool of advisors, the HHRRC established a database of volunteers willing to assist and make a difference in global humanitarian issues and possible violations of human rights.

In the following video message, HHRRC Chair Dr. Dawnie Steadman and the FTCoE express our gratitude for everything Dr. Douglas Ubelaker did to establish and build the Center in his tenure as Chair from 2015 until 2020. Additionally, Dr. Steadman highlights the importance of the HHRRC and the many Center activities that support humanitarian and human rights efforts across the globe.

Below are archived resources highlighting HHRRC funded projects.


2020 AAFS Humanitarian and Human Rights Resource Center Poster & Networking Session

The inaugural Humanitarian and Human Rights Resource Center Poster and Networking Session was hosted on February 18th at the 2020 AAFS Annual Scientific Meeting in Anaheim, CA. This Poster Session was an open meeting where over 200 attendees met HHRRC researchers and mentors in the field to learn about the application of forensic science to investigate humanitarian and human rights injustices.

Click here to view the virtual poster session showcasing materials and posters from that event.

Listen to Our Podcast

 Just So You Know: AAFS Humanitarian and Human Rights Resource Center

 Just So You Know: The HHRRC’s Impact

Watch our Archived Webinars

2018 Series

Building Forensic Capacity Post-Conflict: Lessons from Uganda

Stable Isotope Analysis in a Humanitarian Context 

Isotopes Aiding Identification of Undocumented Border Crosser Human Remains

2017 Series

A Review of Forensic Anthropology in Mexico

Stable Isotope Forensics & Unknown Persons

Analysis & Conservation of Remains in Cambodia

Nerve Agent Uptake and Detection in Human Bone

2017 Series Summary Report

The FTCoE in collaboration with HHRRC hosted a four-part webinar series HHRRC projects addressing forensic applications and recent advanced of global humanitarian and human rights projects requiring HHRRC assistance. This in-brief report highlights the content of the webinar series and the reception of the series by the forensic science community.

Click Here to Read the Full Report 

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