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Just the Double Loop Podcast Crossover

In episode nine of the Identification season, Just Science sits down with Heidi Eldridge, from RTI international, along with Eric Ray and Glenn Langenburg, the co-hosts of the Double Loop Podcast, to discuss the nature of the respective podcasts.  

The Double-Loop podcast has been around for over five years now. While its origin can be traced back to a Game of Thrones conversation over dinner, it has grown into a successful podcast with a large forensic professional following. Eric Ray and Glenn Langenburg are respected voices in the forensic community and use their podcast as an opportunity to educate others about latent print topics. In this episode, Just Science sits down with Glenn and Eric to discuss history, inspiration, and the challenges facing their respective podcasts. 

If you’re interested in hearing more about latent print topics, current events in forensic science, the newest research articles, and the analysis of notable cases from a forensic scientist perspective, listen to Double Loop here.

This season is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence. 

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

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Listen on Google Play Music

 

You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 

 

 


 

Glenn Langenburg is a certified latent print examiner at the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension and also manages a consulting business (Elite Forensic Services, LLC). He has experience with crime scenes and bloodstain pattern evidence and he is certified as a general criminalist by the American Board of Criminalistics. Glenn has a Ph.D. in Forensic Science from the University of Lausanne in Switzerland. His thesis, “A Critical Analysis and Study of the ACE-V Process”, focuses on decision-making and the application of ACE-V by fingerprint experts. Glenn has lectured and hosted workshops nationally and internationally at forensic science conferences in the United States, Canada, and Europe on topics including Daubert issues, research, probabilistic approach, error rates, and fingerprint methodology. He has published numerous research articles in peer reviewed journals. Glenn has the privilege of serving the fingerprint community as a member of SWGFAST (Scientific Working Group for Friction Ridge Analysis, Study, and Technology). He also co-hosts a weekly podcast, “The Double Loop Podcast”, on fingerprint topics with Eric Ray. Most recently, Glenn has taken on a new role at the Minnesota BCA as a Forensic Science Supervisor of the Drug Chemistry Section.

Eric Ray has been employed as a Forensic Scientist since 2007 and is a Certified Latent Print Examiner. He earned a BS in Biochemistry and Molecular & Cellular Biology from the University of Arizona in 2000. As a member of the IAI, Eric is on the Editorial Board of the JFI. As the president of Ray Forensics, Eric has published and presented extensively on the exclusion decision in latent fingerprint comparisons and is developing new extensions to customize Photoshop for latent print examiner use. In his spare time he also co-hosts the Double Loop Podcast, a weekly show on fingerprint topics.

 

 

 

 


Additional Resources:

2018 Impression, Pattern and Trace Evidence Symposium

IAI Training

Double Loop Podcast on Soundcloud

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Just Forensic Technician Vicarious Trauma

In episode eight of the Identification season, Just Science interviews Selena McKay-Davis, lead senior forensic specialist at Riverside Police Department, about job-related stress for forensic technicians and sworn peace officers.

As a forensic technician Selena McKay-Davis is confronted daily with scenes where crimes were committed, and sometimes these scenes are violent or even gruesome. The stress of the position and the daily exposure to violence can make a long term career in this occupation very difficult. While there is research surrounding the trauma that sworn peace officers experience, little is known about the trauma experienced by civilian forensic technicians. During her graduate studies, Selena McKay-Davis identified this gap in knowledge.  Listen along as she discusses her graduate thesis topic covering the similarities and differences between the trauma experienced by officers and civilian forensic technicians

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

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Listen on Google Play Music

 

You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 

 

 


Selena McKay-Davis has fifteen years of experience as a Forensic Specialist, and currently serves as the lead Senior Forensic Specialist at a medium sized California police department. Her duties require her to assist the investigation of all manner of crime scenes (from officer line of duty deaths to burglaries) through the provision of crime scene processing services, laboratory evidence analysis, court testimony, and basic latent print identification. Additionally, she operated for two years as a Coroner Technician at the Riverside County SheriffÕs Department. She has experience teaching criminal justice, forensics and crime scene investigation related curriculum to two for-profit colleges, police department employees, and community members ranging in age from elementary school to senior citizens. She has earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Biology from California State University-San Bernardino and a Master’s Degree in Forensic Sciences from National University.


Additional Resources:

2018 Impression, Pattern and Trace Evidence Symposium

IAI Training

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Just Forensic Microanthropology

In episode seven of the Identification season, Just Science interviews Carlos Gutierrez, a lecturer at Chaminade University of Honolulu, about the new field of Forensic Microanthropology. After finding an unidentified bone, forensic anthropologists must first determine if it belonged to a human or an animal. If it’s an animal bone, they can move on to other case work, but human remains require a much more involved and expensive forensic processes such as DNA testing. For developing countries these tests can be too expensive and time consuming. With limited resources and tight timelines, Carlos Gutierrez wanted to find an affordable and timely way to analyze remains and differentiate between human and animal bones. It was through this need that Forensic Microanthropology was born. Listen along as he discusses the details of Forensic Microanthropology in this episode of Just Science.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

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Listen on Google Play Music

 

You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 

 

 


 

Carlos A. Gutierrez, MSFS, Master of Science in Forensic Science, Lecturer of Forensic Science in the Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Chaminade University of Honolulu. Science Director and Instructor of True Forensic Science LLC.

Mr. Gutierrez earned his college degree of Public Security Administration at Carabineros de Chile school in 2001. In 2002, earned his certificate Reforma Procesal Penal y sus Efectos en la Función Policial (Criminal Procedure Reform and its Impact on the Police Function) dictated by the Police Science Academy of Carabineros de Chile. Then, in 2003, obtained his specialization in Criminalistics in Carabineros de Chiles police agency. Later on, Mr. Gutierrez earned several certificates of different courses made in Argentina, Germany, Spain, Peru and the US. In 2012 obtained his Master degree in Educational Management at Andres Bello University in Chile. Then, in 2016 earned his Master in Science in Forensic Science (MSFS) at Chaminade University of Honolulu, USA.

Throughout his career Mr. Gutierrez has performed important positions such as Subdirector of the Criminalistics Laboratory of Carabineros de Chile police agency in the city of Punta Arenas (Chile), expert of the Ballistics Laboratory of the Criminalistics Laboratory of Carabineros de Chile police agency in the city of Santiago (Chile), Chief of the Copyright and Forensic Anthropology at the same Chilean forensic agency and Director of the Criminalistics Laboratory of Carabineros de Chile police agency in the city of Talca (Chile).

Within Mr. Gutierrez’s professional performance, it can be distinguished his work in the identification processes at different massive disasters, among which we can mention, Chief of the forensic identification team of the fatalities at the fire of the Blue House II hostel, in the city of Punta Arenas on February 3rd, 2007 (Chile); and, forensic identification of the fatalities of the big Earthquake and Tsunami on February 27th, 2010 in the city of Constitution (Chile). This last two years, Mr. Gutierrez has worked in the development of a technique, based on Forensic Microantropology, which allows to identify and to determine whether any small bone fragment found in the crime scene is human or not-human. His prominent professional performance, has opened him the doors to several international associations in the forensic field such as: Asociación Latinoamericana de Antropología Forense (ALAF), Asociación de Antropología Biológica Argentina (AABA), International Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA), The International Association for Identification (IAI), The International Association of Chief of Police (IACP), American Academy of Forensic Science (AAFS) and Colegio de Criminalistas de Chile (COLCRIM).

 

 


Additional Resources:

2018 Impression, Pattern and Trace Evidence Symposium

IAI Training

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Just Improvised Explosive Devices

In episode six of the Identification season, Just Science interviews Hillary Daluz, an instructor for Tritech Forensics and author on latent print analysis. From soda cans and cigarette packs to animal carcasses and pressure cookers, an improvised explosive device is just that: improvised. One of the most difficult parts of I.E.D. identification after the explosion is figuring out what was part of the bomb itself. Hillary Daluz spent 14 months in Iraq as a latent print examiner working on the remains of improvised explosive devices. Listen along as she discusses contextual bias, the difficulty of identifying finger prints on improvised explosives, and the importance of partnering with other disciplines in this episode of Just Science. 

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Listen/Download at:
Listen on Google Play Music

 

You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 

 


Hillary Moses Daluz is currently an instructor for Tri Tech Forensic, a forensic specialist with Forensic Identification Services, and the author of Fundamentals of Fingerprint Analysis and the Fingerprint Analysis Laboratory Workbook (CRC Press, 2014). After earning her Masters of Science in Forensic Science from the University of California, Davis she deployed to the Joint Expeditionary Forensic Facility at Camp Victory in Baghdad, Iraq as a Latent Print Examiner. After returning stateside she became a member of the faculty in the Forensic Sciences program at Chaminade University of Honolulu, teaching at the undergraduate and graduate level. Daluz has worked in a variety of forensics positions including Senior Latent Print Technician with American Systems and Police Identification Specialist with the City of Hayward Police Department in California. Daluz is a member of the International Association for Identification.

 

 

 


Additional Resources:

2018 Impression, Pattern and Trace Evidence Symposium

IAI Training

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Just 19 Hours and 300 miles

In episode five of the Identification season, Just Science interviews Erin Sims, Lab Manager of the Forensic Identification Unit for the Lincoln, Nebraska Police Department, about a case involving methamphetamine use and a double homicide. In the early hours of a seemingly normal morning outside Grand Island, Nebraska, Brandon Crago fled a drug rehabilitation center. 19 hours later, Crago had stolen four different cars, evaded police, and traveled 300 hundred miles. At the end of his journey, he took the lives of a retired couple on a farm just outside Lincoln, NE. Using wound and bloodstain pattern analysis, Erin Sims and her team pieced together the story and linked Crago to the killings. Listen along as she recalls the details of the methamphetamine-fueled car chase that led to a double homicide in this week’s episode of Just Science.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Listen/Download at:
Listen on Google Play Music

 

You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 

 


Ms. Erin Sims has been employed with the Lincoln Nebraska Police Department for 35 years. She started her career as a Uniform Officer, was a Detective/Sergeant for 16yrs, and was promoted to Forensic Lab Manager of the Forensic Identification Unit in December 2008. She has been one of the supervisors in LPD’s Crime Scene Investigation Unit since its inception in 1997. She has instructed at the Nebraska Law Enforcement Training Center and taught Advanced Crime Scene Processes at Nebraska Wesleyan Forensic Science Master’s program for 6 years. Her areas of expertise include Latent Fingerprint processes, Crime Scene Processing, and Bloodstain Pattern Analysis. Ms. Sims is a Certified IAI Crime Scene Investigator and Bloodstain Pattern Analyst.

 

 

 


Additional Resources:

2018 Impression, Pattern and Trace Evidence Symposium

IAI Training

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Just the Molalla Forest Serial Killer

In episode four of the Identification season, Just Science interviews Robert Thompson, Senior Forensic Science Research Manager at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, about his role in the investigation of the Molalla Forest Killer. The Molalla Forest serial murders are arguably the most infamous chain of homicides in Oregon. In 1988, Dayton Leroy Rogers was convicted and imprisoned for the serial murder of seven women over the course of three months. Robert Thompson was heavily involved in the investigation and conviction of this killer. Listen along as our guest discusses the intimate details of the case and the years that followed.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Listen/Download at:
Listen on Google Play Music

 

You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 

 


 

Mr. Robert M. Thompson has been a Senior Forensic Science Research Manager with the Special Programs Office-Forensic Sciences at the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) for 9 years. He has over 38 years of experience as a Forensic Scientist and Criminalist. He is certified in Criminalistics by the American Board of Criminalistics (ABC) and is a past Chairman and current member of the Association of Firearm and Toolmark Examiners (AFTE) Certification Program Committee. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences and a Distinguished Member of AFTE. Mr. Thompson was awarded a MFS from The George Washington University in Washington, DC and a BS in Forensic Science with a Chemistry minor from the California State University in Sacramento, California. Prior to joining NIST, Mr. Thompson was a Senior Firearms and Toolmark Examiner for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) Forensic Science Laboratories and as a Forensic Scientist and Criminalist in crime laboratories with the Washoe County Sheriff ’s Department (Reno, Nevada), Oregon State Police, and the GeneLex Corporation (Seattle, Washington). His court-accepted expert testimony includes Firearms/Toolmark Identification, Proximity Testing, Serology and DNA analysis, Drug Analysis, Hair and Fiber Examination, Blood Spatter Reconstruction, Shoe Print Comparison, and Crime Scene/ Shooting Reconstruction. Mr. Thompson has testified as an expert in numerous Federal and State courts and has active professional affiliations with several regional, national, and international forensic science societies. He is published in the Journal of Forensic Sciences, Forensic Science International, Journal for the Association of Firearm and Toolmark Examiners, Proceedings of SPIE – The International Society for Optical Engineering, NIST Journal of Research, Inside ATF, Measurement Science and Technology, FBI Crime Laboratory Digest, and the Proceedings of Saratov University (Russia).

 

 

 


Additional Resources:

2018 Impression, Pattern and Trace Evidence Symposium

IAI Training

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Just a Modified Direct to DNA Approach to Sexual Assault Kit Testing

In episode three of the Identification season, Just Science interviews forensic biologist Caitlin Rogers. Forensic scientists are always looking to improve the efficiency and accuracy of sexual assault kit testing. Caitlin Rogers is working to improve the procedure by using a modified direct to DNA approach to processing sexual assault kits. Listen along as our guest discusses processing, testing, and analyzing DNA samples from sexual assault kits.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Listen/Download at:
Listen on Google Play Music

 

You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 

 


Caitlin Rogers graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Biophysics with a concentration in Premedical Studies from Columbia University in 2012 and received her Master of Science in Biomedical Forensic Sciences from Boston University School of Medicine in 2014. Caitlin has been employed with the Colorado Bureau of Investigation (CBI) since 2014 conducting forensic serology and DNA casework and is a member of the Crime Scene Unit. She is certified as a Molecular Biology Fellow through the American Board of Criminalistics, has testified in district and county courts across Colorado, and is CBI’s Serology Technical Leader.


Additional Resources:

2018 Impression, Pattern and Trace Evidence Symposium

IAI Training

FTCoE Sexual Assault Reform Resources

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Just Drawing Knowledge from a Forensic Artist

In episode two of the Identification season, Just Science interviews Suzanne Birdwell, a forensic artist with the Texas Department of Public Safety and the current Chair of the IAI Forensic Art Science and Practice Committee. With over 700 cases in her career, Suzanne Birdwell understands the nuances of forensic artistry. Through a collaborative process, forensic artists create likenesses to aid in recognition and identification of a criminal, a decedent, or a missing person. Listen along as our guest discusses sketching from memory, facial reconstruction, age progression, and other aspects of forensic artistry.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

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Listen on Google Play Music

 

You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 

 


IAI-Certified Texas Ranger Forensic Artist Suzanne Birdwell received degrees in Spanish and Criminal Justice with emphases in Forensic Psychology and Anthropology. Along with a range of art studies throughout her life, she has over 1000 hours in specific interviewing, forensic art, postmortem remains and missing/unidentified persons training. In her duties for the Texas Rangers, which is an investigative division of the Texas Department of Public Safety (TXDPS), Suzanne travels the state assisting local, county, state, military and federal agencies. She has developed hundreds of composite drawings of unknown criminals and persons-of-interest. She develops images appropriate for public viewing of unidentified deceased persons, often homicide victims, to further attempts at identification. Suzanne works in tandem with the state Missing & Unidentified Persons Clearinghouse and works closely with The University of North Texas Center for Human Identification. Suzanne has been with TXDPS since 2006, ultimately creating a secondary full-time forensic artist’s position for the Texas Rangers. Suzanne has testified to her work numerous times at criminal trials, being designated an Expert Witness in composite drawing and cognitive interviewing. Suzanne has served on the IAI Forensic Art Subcommittee since 2009, and is now its Chair.


Additional Resources:

2018 Impression, Pattern and Trace Evidence Symposium

IAI Training

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Just the Sole of Impression Pattern Evidence

The Identification season of Just Science will focus on many of the different aspects of identification in forensic investigations. A majority of these interviews were recorded at the 2018 International Forensic Educational Conference in San Antonio, Texas. This conference, held by the International Association for Identification, represents a diverse and knowledgeable membership that meets annually to educate and share techniques, methods, and research into the various forensic science disciplines. In episode one of the Identification season, Just Science interviews Lesley Hammer, former president of the International Association for Identification and the current Chair of the Education Committee of the IAI. Listen along as she discusses pattern and impression evidence collection and the future of IAI.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Listen/Download at:
Listen on Google Play Music

 

You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 

 


Ms. Hammer is a Forensic Scientist with experience in forensic casework, laboratory supervision and scientific instruction. She has performed analyses, reported and testified in latent print, footwear and tire track, controlled substance and crime scene disciplines and holds professional certifications in Forensic Footwear Examination, Criminalistics and Crime Scene Analysis. Ms Hammer supervised a Forensic Physical Unit in an ASCLD accredited laboratory, has published articles, performed research and has provided training to technicians, officers and other forensic scientists in the United States and Canada.


Additional Resources:

2018 Impression, Pattern and Trace Evidence Symposium

IAI Training

Footwear Impression Evidence: Detection, Recovery and Examination, SECOND EDITION

Bill Bodziak