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Just So You Know: AAFS Humanitarian and Human Rights Resource Center

The American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS) Humanitarian and Human Rights Resource Center (HHRRC) seeks to promote humanitarian and human rights in the field of forensic sciences and the NIJ. The FTCoE will help to support key international agencies chosen by the HHRRC to improve the practice of forensic science and strengthen its impact on humanitarian and human rights issues through training and education and dissemination of best practices and guidelines. Some of the main focuses for the program are evidence preservation, training, research, and capacity building around the world. Research discussed in this Just So You Know episode includes looking at skeletal remains from the mass violence in Cambodia, develop the capacity of anthropology in Mexico, how nerve agents are incorporated into bones, and much more. Just Science interviews Dr. Douglas Ubelaker about the HHRRC’s efforts and his contributions to an in-brief about how the NIJ’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence aids their mission.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

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Dr. Douglas Ubelaker, is a curator and senior scientist at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History, and has served as a consultant in forensic anthropology since 1978. As a consultant, he has served as an expert witness, reported on more than 900 cases, and has testified in numerous legal proceedings. Dr. Ubelaker is also the chair of The American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS) Humanitarian and Human Rights Resource Center (HHRRC).

 

Women and Work in Science

How do career trajectories differ for Women in Forensics? It’s not just about showcasing academic rigor, producing great research, and chasing grants. This Just So You Know, we speak with Dr. Campo of FIU and touch on creating women leaders in science, academia, STEM, and forensics, and finding a balance between children and careers, while not sacrificing living other parts of life.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

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Listen on Google Play Music

 

You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 


 

Dr. Nadja Schreiber Compo is an Associate Professor at Florida International University (FIU) in Miami and the Co-Director of the Legal Psychology PhD program. She earned her PhD at the University of Muenster, Germany, and was awarded a postdoctoral fellowship by the German Academic Exchange Service to continue her research at FIU. Her research focuses on investigative interviewing and witness memory, especially of vulnerable witnesses such as children or the intoxicated. Dr. Schreiber Compo focuses on potentially detrimental and beneficial interviewing techniques and their underlying cognitive and social mechanisms to improve the quality and quantity of witness and victim recall. She examines real-world interviewers’ perceptions, experiences, behaviors, and confirmatory bias in a variety of settings including witness and victim interviewing and forensic expertise. Dr. Schreiber Compo has worked with several law enforcement agencies on research and investigative interviewing training and has consulted in various legal cases. She has been an invited speaker at the International Association of Forensic Toxicologists, the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the International Forensic Research Institute at FIU, the Miami-Dade Police Department Forensic Services Bureau, the Miami-Dade County and Allegheny County Public Defender’s Office, the Texas Criminal Defense Attorneys Association, Research Unit for Criminal, Legal, and Investigative Psychology at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, Wofford College, and Florida Atlantic University, among others. Dr. Schreiber Compo has published over 25 peer-reviewed articles and (co) authored over 70 presentations at national and international conferences. She is an Associate Editor for the journal Applied Cognitive Psychology and is on the editorial board of the APA journal Psychology, Public Policy, and the Law. Her research has been funded by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Swedish Research Council.

 

 


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Just So You Know: Leadership Series

In this Just So You Know episode Dr. John Morgan, the host of Just Science, gives a detailed explanation about the Forensic Technology Center of Excellence’s Leadership Series. He discusses the module topics, along with who the instructors are, as well as some of the challenges associated with leadership in the crime lab.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Learn more about the series here

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Dr. Morgan is internationally recognized for his work in forensics, body armor, special operations technology, and predictive policing. He directs and develops forensic science research, training, and quality assurance programs, including the National Institute of Justice Forensic Technology Center of Excellence and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s National Laboratory Certification Program.

Currently, he is responsible for management, business development, and strategic planning to maintain and grow our programs in forensic science and related areas of education, policing, homeland security, defense, and international capacity building.

Previously, Dr. Morgan was a member of the Maryland House of Delegates and Congressional Science Fellow of the American Physical Society. He has served in the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Department of Defense as a senior executive managing programs that encompass scientific research, public safety, military technology, special operations, information systems, and standards. He received the 2007 Service to America Medal for his work to improve the nation’s capacity to conduct DNA analysis.

Just So You Know: Rapid DNA Technology

In this “Just So You Know” episode of Just Science, we discuss this year’s Rapid DNA forum with Chris Asplen, the Executive Director of the National Criminal Justice Association. The 3-day forum, hosted by the Forensic Technology Center of Excellence, was held in Alexandria, VA in August of 2017.  This forum provided more than 130 attendees from the forensic DNA community an opportunity to be updated on commercially available Rapid DNA technologies, hear lessons learned from several early adopters spanning local law enforcement and federal agencies, and discuss moving forward as a community. As one of the many distinguished presenters from the forum, Chris discusses how Rapid DNA is moving forward slowly but surely saving jurisdictions time and money, and that getting the policy right is just as important as getting the technology right.

This season of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Listen/Download at:
    Listen on Google Play Music
You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 


 

Chris Asplen began serving as the Executive Director of the National Criminal Justice Association in January 2016. Mr. Asplen is a national and international expert on the use of DNA technologies. Previously, he served as Director of the DNA Legal Assistance Unit for the American Prosecutors Research Institute and the National District Attorneys Association; he also served as an Assistant United States Attorney and as the Executive Director of the National Commission on the Future of DNA Evidence for the U.S. Department of Justice. Mr. Asplen has worked with governments and law enforcement agencies to implement DNA technology to maximize its ability to identify and convict the guilty while protecting the innocent. Mr. Asplen has testified before the U.S. Congress as well as the South African and Philippine parliaments. He also serves as a consultant to the U.S. Department of State and the Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism on the prosecution of nuclear terrorism crimes.