Just Doobious Driving

In episode five of our Drugs Season, Just Science interviews Jennifer Knudsen, Colorado’s Traffic Safety Resource Prosecutor, and Glenn Davis, the Highway Safety Manager for the Colorado Department of Transportation.

Listen along as Colorado’s recreational marijuana legalization traffic experts discuss the law and operations of the existence of recreational marijuana and its impact on the transportation sector.  They will discuss the post-legalization effects of marijuana on Colorado law enforcement, specifically focusing on driving and traffic topics.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

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Glenn Davis, Colorado Department of Transportation Glen Davis is the Highway Safety Manager for the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT), Highway Safety Office (HSO). Glenn’s areas of responsibilities for the HSO are Impaired Driving, Police Traffic Services, Motorcycle Safety and Speed Enforcement and Control. Glenn has served on the Colorado Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) curriculum committee, State Emergency Medical and Trauma Services Advisory Council, and Colorado Prevention Leadership Council. He is former chair and current vice-chair of the Colorado Task Force on Drunk and Impaired Driving, chair of the Colorado Motorcycle Operator Advisory Board, former secretary and current parliamentarian of the Colorado State Traffic Records Advisory Committee, and the CDOT representative on the Colorado Persistent Drunk Driver Committee and Colorado Teen Driving Alliance. Glenn retired from the Littleton (CO) police department after twenty five years of law enforcement service where he was Drug Recognition Expert (DRE) and Impaired Driving Enforcement Coordinator before joining CDOT. Glenn is a currently a reserve sergeant in the Ft. Lupton Police Department.

 

Jennifer Knudsen is Colorado’s Traffic Safety Resource Prosecutor (TSRP). She works for the Colorado District Attorneys’ Council, which represents Colorado’s elected district attorneys. She graduated from the University of Denver with a Bachelor of Arts in political science (Departmental Honors with Distinction and University Honors) and the University of Colorado School of Law where she earned a juris doctorate and certificate in taxation.

Ms. Knudsen started her career as a judicial law clerk to the Honorable Stephen M. Munsinger (retired) and Brian D. Boatright in the First Judicial District in Golden, Colorado.  She first became a prosecutor in Arapahoe and Douglas Counties in the Eighteenth Judicial District District Attorney’s Office. As an Assistant Attorney General, she represented the Directors of Tax Compliance and Enforcement; the Motor Vehicle Dealer Board; Liquor Enforcement, Division of Motor Vehicles; and Port of Entry at the Colorado Department of Revenue. She has handled other traffic safety matters on a state and local level in private practice and legal counsel to law enforcement.

As TSRP, she produces training programs to tackle cutting edge issues in the area of impaired driving for prosecutors, law enforcement, and other prosecutorial partners. She also acts as a resource to traffic safety professionals in-state and nationwide, produces and edits the Colorado’s Prosecutors DUI Manual, works on state and federal legislation related to traffic safety issues, and oversees the maintenance and creation of online resources for Colorado’s prosecutors. She is also a member of the Colorado DRE Advisory Committee and the MADD Law Enforcement Awards Selection Committee.

Ms. Knudsen is a co-author of Strategies for Prosecuting DWI Cases, which was published during the summer of 2016 by Aspatore (a division of Thomson Reuters). She has also sat on a panel of experts for a Standardized Field Sobriety Testing and Drug Evaluation & Classification Program assessment for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

 

 


Additional Resources:

Cannabis Impairment Quick Assessment 

 

Just Liver Die

In episode four of our Drugs Season, Just Science interviews Dr. Carl Wolf, from the Medical College of Virginia Commonwealth University to discuss his NIJ funded research, titled “Liver Doesn’t DIE, or at least its Enzymes, and Other Useful Information Discovered while Evaluating the Effect of Sample Preparation Techniques on Matrix Effects and Absolute Recovery of Opiates in Liver Tissue using UPLC-MS/MS.”

Stay tuned as we discuss the challenges associated with post-mortem work in forensic toxicology to dispel incorrect assumptions associated with how the human body functions in death. Is your liver dead if the cells are still living? Listen along as we explore this question, novel psychoactive substances and more on forensic toxicology and body fluids.

This episode was recorded at the American Academy of Forensic Sciences 2018 annual meeting where Alex presented the research at the NIJ R&D Symposium. If you missed his talk you can view the archival here.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Listen/Download at:
    Listen on Google Play Music
You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 


 

Dr. Wolf received his BS in Chemistry from Gannon University, Erie, Pennsylvania in 1986, where he received the CRC Press’ Outstanding Freshman Chemist Award.  Dr. Wolf received his MS in Criminal Justice, with a Forensic Science option from Virginia Commonwealth University in 1994, and received his Ph.D. in Pathology, with a focus on Forensic Toxicology from the Medical College of Virginia Campus at Virginia Commonwealth University in 2005. 

 Dr. Wolf has been employed at Medical College of Virginia Hospitals since 1987 in various roles in the Clinical and Forensic Toxicology Laboratories.  Dr. Wolf regularly consults and/or lectures on toxicology and drug testing issues.  Dr. Wolf has given expert testimony in several jurisdictions in the Commonwealth of Virginia and the State of North Carolina.  Dr. Wolf has contributed to over 100 presentations and peer-reviewed publications.  Dr. Wolf is a full member of the Society of Forensic Toxicologists.  Dr. Wolf is a Fellow of the American Board of Forensic Toxicologists (ABFT), and has been certified by ABFT since 2001. Dr. Wolf was a member of the group that received the 2007 Educational Innovation Award from the School of Medicine at the Medical College of Virginia Campus of Virginia Commonwealth University for their work on developing and maintaining an on-line continuing education program for chronic non-malignant pain management curriculum. In 2017, Dr. Wolf received a grant from the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) to study the matrix effects that liver tissue has on the analysis of opiates using ten different sample preparation techniques. 

 


Additional Resources:

VCU Pathology

 

Just Electronic Dance Music Festivals

In episode three of the Drugs Season, Just Science interviews Alex Krotulski, a research scientist, and Amanda Mohr, a forensic scientist 2, at the Center for Forensic Science Research and education. Both discuss their NIJ funded research titled Evaluating Trends in Novel Psychoactive Substances Using a Sentinel Population of Electronic Dance Music Festival Attendees.

This episode was recorded at the America Academy of Forensic Sciences 2018 annual meeting where Alex presented the research at the NIJ R&D Symposium. If you missed his talk you can view the archival here.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Listen/Download at:
    Listen on Google Play Music
You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 


Amanda L.A. Mohr is a graduate of The University of Montana graduating with dual degrees in in Human Biological Sciences and Sociology with an emphasis in Criminology. She then obtained a Masters of Science in Forensic Science from Arcadia University focusing on detection of novel recreational drugs in alternative matrices through her research entitled, “Method Development and Validation for the Detection of 2C-E in Oral Fluid.”

Currently, Mandi serves as a Forensic Scientist II at the Center for Forensic Science Research & Education.  In this role, Mandi works on variety of analytical projects associated with toxicology samples, teaches graduate students on analytical and instrumental toxicology lab, serves as co-principle investigation on grant-funded research and oversees the G John DiGregorio Summer Science Program.  Mandi maintains an active research agenda and is funded through the National Institute of Justice.  Her current research interests include method development for the identification and prevalence determination of novel psychoactive substances, oral fluid drug testing, and drug impaired driving.  In recognition of the advancements she has made to the field of forensic toxicology through research, Mandi was awarded the Forensic Sciences Foundation Student Scholarship Award by the American Academy of Forensic Sciences in 2013.

 

Alex Krotulski is a graduate of Loyola University New Orleans graduating with a Bachelor’s degree in Chemistry. He then obtained a Master’s degree in Forensic Science from Arcadia University focusing in forensic toxicology through research with method development and validation for THC from blood and oral fluid.

Currently, Alex serves as a Research Scientist I at the Center for Forensic Science Research & Education.  In this role, Alex is involved in method development and validation for our platforms involving working with novel psychoactive substances. Alex is currently working with the Sciex TripleTOF ® 5600+ for method development involving drug screening in blood, urine, and oral fluid. Alex also helps with graduate courses involving instrumentation and analysis using our various state-of-the-art instrumental platforms. Alex maintains an active research agenda and is funded through the National Institute of Justice.  His current research interests include novel instrumental platforms and techniques for the identification and analysis of substance within toxicological matrices.

 

 


Additional Resources:

The Center for Forensic Science Research and Education

 Recreational Drug Use Trends and Emerging Analytes Identified in Blood, Urine, and/or Oral Fluid from Attendees at an Electronic Dance Music Festival Poster

Analysis of Biological Specimens for the Presence of Novel Psychoactive Substances from Attendees at an Electronic Dance Music Festival

Just Drug Courts

In episode two of the Drugs Season, Just Science interviews Preeti Menon, the Senior Associate Director at the Justice Programs Office, a center in the School of Public Affairs at America University. One of Ms. Menon’s many roles include being the Principal Investigator and project director for the National Drug Court Resource Center, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance, and the Principal Investigator for the Juvenile Drug Treatment Court Training and Technical Assistance Initiative, funded by the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

Drug courts are one of the many tools the Department of Justice is using to combat overcrowded prisons and dangerous drug addictions. Listen along to find out how these courts are improving the justice system, and how American University is contributing in the fight against addiction.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Listen/Download at:
    Listen on Google Play Music
You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 


Preeti P. Menon is the Senior Associate Director at the Justice Programs Office. She is passionate about bringing collaboration and communication as important bases for the success of any initiative. She has extensive experience in justice system policy development and criminal justice program operations as well as project management. She leads JPO’s grant-funded projects and coordinates with project directors on tasks and deliverables. She is currently the Principal Investigator and project director of the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), Bureau of Justice Assistance’s (BJA) National Drug Court Resource Center. Ms. Menon is also the Principal Investigator for DOJ Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention’s (OJJDP) Juvenile Drug Treatment Courts TTA and has over twenty years of experience providing TTA to state and local justice agencies, coordinating roundtables, workshops and forums, and providing research and analytical support in justice related initiatives. She has worked on several problem-solving courts initiatives, which includes transferring and launching the Veterans Treatment Courts newsletter, consulting on a community court mentoring project for the Center for Court Innovation (CCI), supporting a drug court training and technical assistance (TTA) project. In addition, she created the framework for JPO’s Right to Counsel National Campaign and demonstrated the importance of collaboration at all levels. Prior to joining American University, she served as a consultant with AU for BJA’s Drug Court TTA Project and, previously, at the U.S. Department of Justice for eight years as a Policy Advisor on Adjudication for the BJA and as a Social Science Program Specialist for OJJDP. Prior to joining the federal government, she worked as a Planning Specialist on contracts with the MD Dept of Juvenile Justice and the U.S. DOJ, National Institute of Justice. She has co-authored and provided writing and editing support for analytical papers on criminal justice case management and integration. In addition, while working with Federal Data Corporation as a Research Assistant, she provided research support for the supplement to the Surgeon General’s Report on Mental Health: Culture, Race, and Ethnicity, and the Surgeon General’s Report on Youth Violence.

 


Additional Resources:

NDCRC Website

NDCRC Resources

On the Docket Podcast

American University Justice Programs Office

NDCRC Facebook

NDCRC Twitter

American University Justice Programs Office Twitter

Just Field Identification Drug Officer

With this episode we kick off our Drugs season. Topics will range from legalization of marijuana in relation to police officers, the opioid epidemic, Electronic Dance Music Festivals, how witnesses’ and victims’ memory of events can be affected by alcohol, current vaping research, drug courts, and much more.

Episode one features Nancy Crump, an Assistant Crime Laboratory Administrator at the Phoenix Police Department. In this episode Just Science discusses the creation of the Field Identification Drug Officer Program. Nancy and John discuss how the lack of laboratory resources creates an inefficient system for testing drugs found in the field and possible solutions for this issue.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Listen/Download at:
    Listen on Google Play Music
You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 


Nancy Crump is currently an Assistant Crime Laboratory Administrator with the Phoenix Police Department Laboratory Services Bureau (LSB). She has held this position since November 2005. Since joining the Phoenix Police Department as a civilian employee in the LSB in 1998, Ms. Crump has worked as a Criminalist and Criminalist Supervisor in the Controlled Substances Section. Her duties have ranged from drug analysis, providing expert testimony and training police officers in drug recognition to the creation, implementation, expansion and oversight of the Phoenix Police Department Field Identification (or CSO) program. This program was used as the model for a national program sponsored by the National Institute for Justice (NIJ), which began implementation as a pilot program in November 2006.

Nancy earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry from the University of Utah in 1990. She attended the Phoenix Police Department’s Enlightened Leadership Seminar in 2001 and also successfully completed the City of Phoenix Supervisor Academy in 2003. Ms. Crump was a graduate of the first class of the Leadership in Police Organizations (LPO) program in Arizona. She serves as an Arizona Peace Officer Standards and Training Board (AZPOST) instructor. She has also received training as an auditor of Crime Laboratories from the National Forensic Science Technology Center (NFSTC) and the American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors/Laboratory Accreditation Board (ASCLD/LAB).

Nancy is a member of the Clandestine Laboratory Investigating Chemists Association, the Southwestern Association of Forensic Scientists, the American Academy of Forensic Sciences and the American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors.


Additional Resources:

FIELD INVESTIGATION DRUG OFFICER (FIDO) – FIU