Just Opioid Financial Burden on Crime Labs

In episode twelve of our Drugs Season, Just Science speaks to Dr. Paul Speaker, from West Virginia University, about the economic burden our justice system has from opioid deaths. They are estimating that the crime labs alone are spending around 270 million dollars a year just on the opioid crisis. Laboratory budgets are not growing fast enough to handle this drain on resources. Listen along as Just Science delves into the data of the opioid crisis. This episode will conclude the FTCOE’s season on drugs.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Click here to learn more and register for Dr. Logan’s 3 Part Series on Best Practices Guidance for Advancing Research Initiatives and Combatting the Synthetic Drug Epidemic

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You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 


Paul J. Speaker is a faculty member of the West Virginia University Finance Department. Dr. Speaker also holds the position of Vice President of Operations Management Consultants LLC and the position of President of Forensic Science Management Consultants, LLC, which specializes in the business of forensics using the forensics of business. Dr. Speaker’s research activity is concentrated in economic modeling, including regulated industries, business valuation, process engineering, financial institutions, the role of not-for-profit institutions, the impact of technology, and the business of forensics. His teaching areas include corporate finance and business valuation. He has been active with curriculum design, integration of course work, and developments in distance learning technology.  Speaker regularly serves as a consultant to several industries, including the forensic community, defense sector, energy sector, and banking and financial institutions. His clients include the giants in each of these industries, ASCLD, ATK, Peabody Energy, and Citigroup, respectively. He is an active participant in the Center for Executive Education programs, among other clients, serving Simonton Windows, Woodcraft, Ashland Coal, Inc., Massey Energy, the Department of Energy, and others. He has served as a consultant to Ashland Oil, West Virginia Petroleum Council, National Research Center for Coal and Energy, West Virginia Trust Fund, and the U.S. Department of Energy, and numerous forensic laboratories, among others. He has presented seminars and workshops across the energy sector and to the forensic community, including workshops at multiple ASCLD Symposia and the meetings of the California crime laboratory community. Dr. Speaker has been recognized for his teaching excellence. He has received Outstanding Teacher Awards from the College of Business and Economics twenty times in his career. Amongst others, he has been recognized for the College of Business and Economics Award for Outstanding Faculty Technology Implementation, a WVU Outstanding Teacher Award, the Golden Apple for Outstanding Faculty, Beta Gamma Sigma Professor of the Year, and a WVU Foundation Award for Outstanding Teaching. Dr. Speaker has also been recognized by the College for Outstanding Service.

Dr. Speaker’s Season One Podcast – Just Economics

 

 


Additional Resources:

WVU’s FORESIGHT PROGRAM PAGE

OPIOID CRISIS – A PUBLIC HEALTH ENEMY WEBINAR SERIES

RELATED JUST SCIENCE EPISODES 

Drugs: Just Drug Courts

Drugs: Just Field Identification Drug Officer 

Drugs: Just the State of Pathology

Drugs: Just Fentanyl Lab Fads with ASCLD

REPORTS OF ADVERSE EVENTS ASSOCIATED WITH USE OF NOVEL PSYCHOACTIVE SUBSTANCES, 2013–2016: A REVIEW

TECHBEAT ARTICLE: FTCOE OPIOID WEBINAR SERIES SHARES KNOWLEDGE, PROMOTES COLLABORATION 

Just Classifying Emerging Compounds

In episode eleven of our Drugs Season, Just Science visits Atlanta for the 45th Annual ASCLD symposium to visit with Dr. Barry Logan, Sr. Vice President of Forensic Science Initiatives and Chief of Forensic Toxicology at National Medical Services, to discuss the convergence of drivers of the national opioid epidemic. Follow along to learn what’s in these novel compounds, and why it matters to illicit drug manufacturers, regulatory agencies, and local crime labs.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Click here to learn more and register for Dr. Logan’s 3 Part Series

Listen/Download at:
Listen on Google Play Music

 

You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 


Dr. Barry K. Logan is Sr. Vice President of Forensic Science Initiatives, Chief Scientist, at NMS Labs in Willow Grove, Pennsylvania, where his responsibilities include management of toxicology resources, new test design and development, and expert testimony in forensic toxicology and chemistry. Dr. Logan is a Fellow of the American Board of Forensic Toxicologists (ABFT), and has over one hundred (100) publications and four hundred (400) presentations in forensic toxicology and analytical chemistry, including work on the effects of methamphetamine, cocaine and marijuana on drivers, drug caused and related death. His recent work has focused on the analytical and interpretive toxicology of emerging recreational and designer drugs. Dr. Logan’s other appointments include Executive Director of the Robert F. Borkenstein course at Indiana University, and Executive Director at the Center for Forensic Science Research and Education (CFSRE) at the Fredric Rieders Family Foundation in suburban Philadelphia. He holds academic appointments at Indiana University, Arcadia University and Thomas Jefferson University. In recognition of his work and contributions, Dr. Logan has received numerous national and international awards, and in 2013-14 served as President of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS).

 

 


Additional Resources:

OPIOID CRISIS – A PUBLIC HEALTH ENEMY WEBINAR SERIES

RELATED JUST SCIENCE EPISODES 

Drugs: Just Drug Courts

Drugs: Just Field Identification Drug Officer 

Drugs: Just the State of Pathology

Drugs: Just Fentanyl Lab Fads with ASCLD

REPORTS OF ADVERSE EVENTS ASSOCIATED WITH USE OF NOVEL PSYCHOACTIVE SUBSTANCES, 2013–2016: A REVIEW

TECHBEAT ARTICLE: FTCOE OPIOID WEBINAR SERIES SHARES KNOWLEDGE, PROMOTES COLLABORATION 

Just Fentanyl Lab Fads with ASCLD

In episode ten of our Drugs Season, Just Science visits Atlanta for the 45th Annual ASCLD symposium to talk with the Orange County, California Laboratory Director, and chair of the ASCLD Opioid Taskforce Committee, Bruce Houlihan. Listen along as John and Bruce tackle the nation’s most complex drug war front on the topic of seized drugs in labs, and why post-mortem findings, research, and collaborations are hot topics around today’s changing landscape for laboratory safety.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Listen/Download at:
Listen on Google Play Music

 

You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 


Mr. Houlihan is the chair of the ASCLD Opioid Task Force committee, and serves as director of the Orange County Crime Laboratory in Orange County, California. The Opioid Task Force is a consortium of U.S. crime laboratory directors, with representatives from forensic organizations such as the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, U.S. federal agencies, private toxicological laboratories, and academic institutions.

 

 

 

 

 


Additional Resources:

OPIOID CRISIS – A PUBLIC HEALTH ENEMY WEBINAR SERIES

RELATED JUST SCIENCE EPISODES 

Drugs: Just Drug Courts

Drugs: Just Field Identification Drug Officer 

Drugs: Just the State of Pathology

REPORTS OF ADVERSE EVENTS ASSOCIATED WITH USE OF NOVEL PSYCHOACTIVE SUBSTANCES, 2013–2016: A REVIEW

TECHBEAT ARTICLE: FTCOE OPIOID WEBINAR SERIES SHARES KNOWLEDGE, PROMOTES COLLABORATION 

Just Solving the Opioid Crisis

In episode Nine of our Drugs Season, Just Science discusses the Opioid Epidemic with RTI International’s Dr. Gary Zarkin and Dr. Jeri Ropero-Miller. Solving the United State’s Opioid Epidemic that’s riddled with unknowns and inconsistencies starts with a holistic understanding of the pervading issues. It’s not just the prevention and treatment associated with novel psychoactive substances, but surveillance, drug chemistry identification, legislative and policy reform, and influential stakeholders acting in a concerted effort that will turn the tide of the nation’s most devastating drug war front. Follow along with Just Science as we discuss the opioid epidemic, from its history and origins, to modern day strategies for prevention and treatment that capitalize on the use of existing data and policies to help home in on a national solution.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Listen/Download at:
Listen on Google Play Music

 

You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 


Gary A. Zarkin, PhD, is a Distinguished Fellow in the Behavioral Health and Criminal Justice Research Division. He has led or participated in many projects involving the economic analysis of drug treatment, prevention, and studies of workplace substance abuse. Dr. Zarkin has published extensively on the cost, cost-effectiveness, and the benefit-cost of substance abuse interventions.

He currently leads the Analytical Support Contract for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and is estimating the cost and cost-effectiveness of interventions on several projects funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. He previously led the development of a method to estimate the cost of services (the Substance Abuse Services Cost Analysis Program [SASCAP]) for methadone treatment, a therapy for opioid dependence.

Before coming to RTI, Dr. Zarkin was an assistant professor of economics at Duke University and a research associate professor at Duke University’s Institute of Statistics and Decision Sciences. He has published on economics, substance abuse, and health service topics in a wide range of professional journals.

 

Dr. Jeri Ropero-Miller is a Principal Investigator (PI) and Senior Research Forensic Scientist for RTI International’s Center for Forensic Sciences. She is a Board-certified Forensic Toxicologist with Diplomate status on the American Board of Forensic Toxicology (F-ABFT). She has more than 20 years of experience conducting research, training, technology transfer, and evaluations in forensic science and criminal justice.

Her current projects include the Forensic Technology Center of Excellence (FTCoE, for the National Institute of Justice, NIJ), the National Laboratory Certification Program (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services, SAMHSA), and the National Forensic Laboratory Information System (Drug Enforcement Administration, DEA). Dr. Ropero-Miller has supported other projects, including the Census for Medical Examiner and Coroner Offices (for the Bureau of Justice Statistics), the 2007 Survey of Law Enforcement Forensic Evidence Processing (NIJ), the Technology Transfer Strategies of Forensic Science Research and Development (R&D) to the Practitioner End-User (NIJ), and several web-based continuing education and forensic training programs that offer low- or no-cost training to forensic scientists and ancillary professionals (NIJ, Office for Victims of Crime, OVC). Her work has been extensively published in the areas of clinical and forensic toxicology, including a Chapter in the 2012 Forensic Science: Current Issues, Future Directions.

Prior to her tenure with RTI, she served as the Deputy Chief Toxicologist at the State of North Carolina Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. She is currently on the Board of Directors for the the Forensic Sciences Foundation of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS) and the ABFT, and is the Executive Secretary for the Scientific Area Committee of Chemistry/ Instrumental Analysis (National Institute of Standards and Technology, NIST).

 


Additional Resources:

OPIOID CRISIS – A PUBLIC HEALTH ENEMY WEBINAR SERIES

RELATED JUST SCIENCE EPISODES 

Drugs: Just Drug Courts

Drugs: Just Field Identification Drug Officer 

Drugs: Just the State of Pathology

REPORTS OF ADVERSE EVENTS ASSOCIATED WITH USE OF NOVEL PSYCHOACTIVE SUBSTANCES, 2013–2016: A REVIEW

TECHBEAT ARTICLE: FTCOE OPIOID WEBINAR SERIES SHARES KNOWLEDGE, PROMOTES COLLABORATION 

Just Chasing the E-Cig Dragon

In episode eight of our Drugs Season, Just Science discusses research in the area of e-cigarettes with Dr. Michelle Peace. Vaping, the act of inhaling vapor from e-liquid through a vaporizer, or also known as an e-cigarette, has gained popularity in recent years. The first half of the episode was recorded over a year ago. During the second half Dr. Peace will give us an update on where her research stands today.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Listen/Download at:
Listen on Google Play Music

 

You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 


Dr. Peace holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Wittenberg University in Springfield, Ohio where she majored in Chemistry and minored in Biology.  She has worked as a research technician for Liqui-Box Corporation, developing flavored bottled water and improved delivery systems for wine and condiments in bag-in-box units.  She was also a research technician for Procter and Gamble in the Paper Products Division, improving diaper and feminine hygiene products.

After several years at the bench, she returned to school to receive her Master of Forensic Science degree

from George Washington University and a Ph.D. from Virginia Commonwealth University’s Medical Campus, specializing in Forensic Toxicology.

She helped develop the undergraduate program in Forensic Science at VCU.  She has served as the Laboratory manager of Kroll Laboratories, a private forensic toxicology laboratory specializing in urine drug testing, where she monitored and optimized work flow of approximately 4,000 specimens per day, interpreted results and testified for clients, and trained staff and probation officers.  She returned to VCU in August 2007 as the Associate Chairperson of the Department of Forensic Science.

Dr. Peace continues to consult for Kroll Laboratories and private companies developing drug testing programs.  She also helps to train crime scene investigators in the Mid-Atlantic region in the identification, collection, and preservation of entomological evidence and develops and teaches forensic science workshops for elementary and high school teachers.

 


Additional Resources:

WEBINAR: THE ABUSE OF E-CIGS, THE IMPACT ON CRIMINAL JUSTICE

WEBINAR: TECHNICAL ADVANCES IN THE VISUAL DOCUMENTATION CRIME SCENES

Just Alcohol and Witness Recall

In episode seven of our Drugs Season, Just Science discusses with Dr. Nadja Schreiber Compo, an associate professor at Florida International University, her research on the effects of alcohol on witnesses’ and victims’ memory for events and faces. Victims and witnesses are discredited for being intoxicated, and may encounter obstacles as a result, but there is no science at this point that suggests that alcohol negatively affects witnesses memory for a face. Listen along as the discussion meanders along the research and perceptions surrounding the credibility of intoxicated victim and witness testimonies.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Listen/Download at:
Listen on Google Play Music

 

You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 


 

Dr. Nadja Schreiber Compo is an Associate Professor at Florida International University (FIU) in Miami and the Co-Director of the Legal Psychology PhD program. She earned her PhD at the University of Muenster, Germany, and was awarded a postdoctoral fellowship by the German Academic Exchange Service to continue her research at FIU. Her research focuses on investigative interviewing and witness memory, especially of vulnerable witnesses such as children or the intoxicated. Dr. Schreiber Compo focuses on potentially detrimental and beneficial interviewing techniques and their underlying cognitive and social mechanisms to improve the quality and quantity of witness and victim recall. She examines real-world interviewers’ perceptions, experiences, behaviors, and confirmatory bias in a variety of settings including witness and victim interviewing and forensic expertise. Dr. Schreiber Compo has worked with several law enforcement agencies on research and investigative interviewing training and has consulted in various legal cases. She has been an invited speaker at the International Association of Forensic Toxicologists, the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the International Forensic Research Institute at FIU, the Miami-Dade Police Department Forensic Services Bureau, the Miami-Dade County and Allegheny County Public Defender’s Office, the Texas Criminal Defense Attorneys Association, Research Unit for Criminal, Legal, and Investigative Psychology at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, Wofford College, and Florida Atlantic University, among others. Dr. Schreiber Compo has published over 25 peer-reviewed articles and (co) authored over 70 presentations at national and international conferences. She is an Associate Editor for the journal Applied Cognitive Psychology and is on the editorial board of the APA journal Psychology, Public Policy, and the Law. Her research has been funded by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Swedish Research Council.

 

 


Additional Resources:

Dr. Schreiber Compo’s FIU Page

Dr. Schreiber Compo’s Publications

 

Just the State of Pathology

In episode six of the Drugs Season, Randy Hanzlick of the Fulton County Medical Examiner’s Office in Atlanta explores the field of forensic pathology. Listen along as Dr. John Morgan and Dr. Hanzlick discuss medicolegal death investigation, the history of forensic pathology, board certifications and standards, and more. This episode also discusses the link between the shortage of pathologists and the Opioid Crisis.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Listen/Download at:
Listen on Google Play Music

You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 


 

Dr. Hanzlick graduated from the Ohio State University College of Medicine in 1976. He worked in Atlanta, GA and specialized in Anatomic and Forensic Pathology. Dr. Hanzlick is retired Chief Medical Examiner in Fulton County, Georgia and Emeritus Professor with Emory University School of Medicine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Additional Resources:

Randy’s Song “I’d Rather Have A Bottle In Front Of Me (Than A Frontal Lobotomy)”

 

Just Doobious Driving

In episode five of our Drugs Season, Just Science interviews Jennifer Knudsen, Colorado’s Traffic Safety Resource Prosecutor, and Glenn Davis, the Highway Safety Manager for the Colorado Department of Transportation.

Listen along as Colorado’s recreational marijuana legalization traffic experts discuss the law and operations of the existence of recreational marijuana and its impact on the transportation sector.  They will discuss the post-legalization effects of marijuana on Colorado law enforcement, specifically focusing on driving and traffic topics.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Listen/Download at:
    Listen on Google Play Music
You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 


 

Glenn Davis, Colorado Department of Transportation Glen Davis is the Highway Safety Manager for the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT), Highway Safety Office (HSO). Glenn’s areas of responsibilities for the HSO are Impaired Driving, Police Traffic Services, Motorcycle Safety and Speed Enforcement and Control. Glenn has served on the Colorado Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) curriculum committee, State Emergency Medical and Trauma Services Advisory Council, and Colorado Prevention Leadership Council. He is former chair and current vice-chair of the Colorado Task Force on Drunk and Impaired Driving, chair of the Colorado Motorcycle Operator Advisory Board, former secretary and current parliamentarian of the Colorado State Traffic Records Advisory Committee, and the CDOT representative on the Colorado Persistent Drunk Driver Committee and Colorado Teen Driving Alliance. Glenn retired from the Littleton (CO) police department after twenty five years of law enforcement service where he was Drug Recognition Expert (DRE) and Impaired Driving Enforcement Coordinator before joining CDOT. Glenn is a currently a reserve sergeant in the Ft. Lupton Police Department.

 

Jennifer Knudsen is Colorado’s Traffic Safety Resource Prosecutor (TSRP). She works for the Colorado District Attorneys’ Council, which represents Colorado’s elected district attorneys. She graduated from the University of Denver with a Bachelor of Arts in political science (Departmental Honors with Distinction and University Honors) and the University of Colorado School of Law where she earned a juris doctorate and certificate in taxation.

Ms. Knudsen started her career as a judicial law clerk to the Honorable Stephen M. Munsinger (retired) and Brian D. Boatright in the First Judicial District in Golden, Colorado.  She first became a prosecutor in Arapahoe and Douglas Counties in the Eighteenth Judicial District District Attorney’s Office. As an Assistant Attorney General, she represented the Directors of Tax Compliance and Enforcement; the Motor Vehicle Dealer Board; Liquor Enforcement, Division of Motor Vehicles; and Port of Entry at the Colorado Department of Revenue. She has handled other traffic safety matters on a state and local level in private practice and legal counsel to law enforcement.

As TSRP, she produces training programs to tackle cutting edge issues in the area of impaired driving for prosecutors, law enforcement, and other prosecutorial partners. She also acts as a resource to traffic safety professionals in-state and nationwide, produces and edits the Colorado’s Prosecutors DUI Manual, works on state and federal legislation related to traffic safety issues, and oversees the maintenance and creation of online resources for Colorado’s prosecutors. She is also a member of the Colorado DRE Advisory Committee and the MADD Law Enforcement Awards Selection Committee.

Ms. Knudsen is a co-author of Strategies for Prosecuting DWI Cases, which was published during the summer of 2016 by Aspatore (a division of Thomson Reuters). She has also sat on a panel of experts for a Standardized Field Sobriety Testing and Drug Evaluation & Classification Program assessment for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

 

 


Additional Resources:

Cannabis Impairment Quick Assessment 

 

Just Liver Die

In episode four of our Drugs Season, Just Science interviews Dr. Carl Wolf, from the Medical College of Virginia Commonwealth University to discuss his NIJ funded research, titled “Liver Doesn’t DIE, or at least its Enzymes, and Other Useful Information Discovered while Evaluating the Effect of Sample Preparation Techniques on Matrix Effects and Absolute Recovery of Opiates in Liver Tissue using UPLC-MS/MS.”

Stay tuned as we discuss the challenges associated with post-mortem work in forensic toxicology to dispel incorrect assumptions associated with how the human body functions in death. Is your liver dead if the cells are still living? Listen along as we explore this question, novel psychoactive substances and more on forensic toxicology and body fluids.

This episode was recorded at the American Academy of Forensic Sciences 2018 annual meeting where Dr. Wolf presented the research at the NIJ R&D Symposium. If you missed his talk, you can view the archival here.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Listen/Download at:
    Listen on Google Play Music
You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 


 

Dr. Wolf received his BS in Chemistry from Gannon University, Erie, Pennsylvania in 1986, where he received the CRC Press’ Outstanding Freshman Chemist Award.  Dr. Wolf received his MS in Criminal Justice, with a Forensic Science option from Virginia Commonwealth University in 1994, and received his Ph.D. in Pathology, with a focus on Forensic Toxicology from the Medical College of Virginia Campus at Virginia Commonwealth University in 2005. 

 Dr. Wolf has been employed at Medical College of Virginia Hospitals since 1987 in various roles in the Clinical and Forensic Toxicology Laboratories.  Dr. Wolf regularly consults and/or lectures on toxicology and drug testing issues.  Dr. Wolf has given expert testimony in several jurisdictions in the Commonwealth of Virginia and the State of North Carolina.  Dr. Wolf has contributed to over 100 presentations and peer-reviewed publications.  Dr. Wolf is a full member of the Society of Forensic Toxicologists.  Dr. Wolf is a Fellow of the American Board of Forensic Toxicologists (ABFT), and has been certified by ABFT since 2001. Dr. Wolf was a member of the group that received the 2007 Educational Innovation Award from the School of Medicine at the Medical College of Virginia Campus of Virginia Commonwealth University for their work on developing and maintaining an on-line continuing education program for chronic non-malignant pain management curriculum. In 2017, Dr. Wolf received a grant from the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) to study the matrix effects that liver tissue has on the analysis of opiates using ten different sample preparation techniques. 

 


Additional Resources:

VCU Pathology

 

Just Electronic Dance Music Festivals

In episode three of the Drugs Season, Just Science interviews Alex Krotulski, a research scientist, and Amanda Mohr, a forensic scientist 2, at the Center for Forensic Science Research and education. Both discuss their NIJ funded research titled Evaluating Trends in Novel Psychoactive Substances Using a Sentinel Population of Electronic Dance Music Festival Attendees.

This episode was recorded at the America Academy of Forensic Sciences 2018 annual meeting where Alex presented the research at the NIJ R&D Symposium. If you missed his talk you can view the archival here.

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Listen/Download at:
    Listen on Google Play Music
You can also find us on Stitcher or Soundcloud 


Amanda L.A. Mohr is a graduate of The University of Montana graduating with dual degrees in in Human Biological Sciences and Sociology with an emphasis in Criminology. She then obtained a Masters of Science in Forensic Science from Arcadia University focusing on detection of novel recreational drugs in alternative matrices through her research entitled, “Method Development and Validation for the Detection of 2C-E in Oral Fluid.”

Currently, Mandi serves as a Forensic Scientist II at the Center for Forensic Science Research & Education.  In this role, Mandi works on variety of analytical projects associated with toxicology samples, teaches graduate students on analytical and instrumental toxicology lab, serves as co-principle investigation on grant-funded research and oversees the G John DiGregorio Summer Science Program.  Mandi maintains an active research agenda and is funded through the National Institute of Justice.  Her current research interests include method development for the identification and prevalence determination of novel psychoactive substances, oral fluid drug testing, and drug impaired driving.  In recognition of the advancements she has made to the field of forensic toxicology through research, Mandi was awarded the Forensic Sciences Foundation Student Scholarship Award by the American Academy of Forensic Sciences in 2013.

 

Alex Krotulski is a graduate of Loyola University New Orleans graduating with a Bachelor’s degree in Chemistry. He then obtained a Master’s degree in Forensic Science from Arcadia University focusing in forensic toxicology through research with method development and validation for THC from blood and oral fluid.

Currently, Alex serves as a Research Scientist I at the Center for Forensic Science Research & Education.  In this role, Alex is involved in method development and validation for our platforms involving working with novel psychoactive substances. Alex is currently working with the Sciex TripleTOF ® 5600+ for method development involving drug screening in blood, urine, and oral fluid. Alex also helps with graduate courses involving instrumentation and analysis using our various state-of-the-art instrumental platforms. Alex maintains an active research agenda and is funded through the National Institute of Justice.  His current research interests include novel instrumental platforms and techniques for the identification and analysis of substance within toxicological matrices.

 

 


Additional Resources:

The Center for Forensic Science Research and Education

 Recreational Drug Use Trends and Emerging Analytes Identified in Blood, Urine, and/or Oral Fluid from Attendees at an Electronic Dance Music Festival Poster

Analysis of Biological Specimens for the Presence of Novel Psychoactive Substances from Attendees at an Electronic Dance Music Festival