<<< back to all episodes

Episode Overview

In episode four of the Case Studies Season, Just Science sat down with forensic consultant, author, and instructor Brian Dalrymple to discuss his research and impact on the field of latent print identification. 

In 1977, a team of researchers developed a method for detecting fingerprints by examining inherent fluorescence using an argon ion laser. This new technology revolutionized the field of latent print identification. Brian Dalrymple was an original member of that research team, but his career did not stop there. He has completed approximately 100 examinations of murder victims for fingerprint evidence, authored several journal articles and books, and contributed to the widespread adoption of lasers used for detection. Listen along as he discusses the origins of his research and methods for examining bodies for fingerprints in this episode of Just Science. 

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Just Science · Just Fingerprints And Lasers_2020 Case Studies_145

Listen/Download at: Itunes, StitcherSoundcloudSpotify

Guest Bio

Brian Dalrymple was part of the original research team that introduced lasers in 1977.  He retired in 1999 from the Ontario Provincial Police as Manager, Forensic Identification Services.  He initiated the first computer evidence enhancement system in Canada in 1991.  He initiated and co-wrote the SOP for body examination for the province of Ontario and during his career, completed approximately 100 examinations of murder victims for fingerprint evidence.  He is currently a forensic consultant (Brian Dalrymple & Associates), an instructor for Ron Smith and Associates, and an adjunct professor at Laurentian University.  He is the recipient of the Dondero Award (International Association for Identification), the Foster Award (Canadian Identification Society) and the Lewis Minshall Award (The Fingerprint Society). 

Books 

  • Crime and Measurement: Methods in Forensic Investigation, Carolina Academic Press, M. Nafte, B. Dalrymple,  
  • First edition 2011 
  • Second edition 2015 
  • The Skin of Murder Victims: Fingerprints and Other Evidence, Carolina Academic Press, B. Dalrymple, 2014 
  • Forensic Digital Image Processing: Optimization of Impression Evidence, CRC Press, B. Dalrymple, J. Smith, 2018 

Additional Resources

 Crime Scene Resources

 

<<< back to all episodes

Episode Overview

In episode three of the Case Studies Season, Just Science sat down with Heather Conner, Latent Print Unit Technical Leader in Mesa Police Department’s Forensic Services, about the investigation of a grisly murder in Arizona. 

In June of 2008, Travis Alexander was found dead in the bathroom of his home. His killer, ex-girlfriend Jodi Arias, was found guilty of first-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison. Heather Conner and her team used a variety of forensic disciplines to piece together the crime scene and affirm the conviction. Listen along as she discusses her journey in forensics, the investigation of the murder of Travis Alexander, and the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to crime scene analysis in this episode of Just Science. 

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Just Science · Just The Jodi Arias Case_2020 Case Studies_144

Listen/Download at: Itunes, StitcherSoundcloudSpotify

Guest Bio

Heather Conner is a Forensic Scientist Technical Leader with the Latent Print Unit of the Mesa Police Department Forensic Services. She is a certified latent print examiner and a certified crime scene investigator through the International Association for Identification (IAI). 

Heather has been with the Mesa Police Department since 2004, previously holding the positions of Crime Scene Technician and Forensic Services Laboratory Technician prior to joining the Latent Print Unit in 2005. She is currently an International Association for Identification (IAI) member, a member of the IAI Latent Print Identification Science and Practice Subcommittee, and serves as the Secretary for the Arizona Identification Council, the state division of the IAI. 

Heather received a Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry from Arizona State University, a Bachelor of Science in Anthropology and Journalism from the University of La Verne, and an Associate of Science in Forensic Technology from Grossmont College.  

Additional Resources

 Crime Scene Resources

 

<<< back to all episodes

Episode Overview

In episode two, Just Science sat down with Erin Sims, Forensic Lab Manager at the Lincoln, Nebraska Police Department, to talk about bloodstain pattern evidence in forensic investigations. 

Not all crime scenes will have bloodstains. But when they are present, analysts can use them to help determine the types of activities or mechanisms that produced them. Erin Sims believes that bloodstain patterns can tell the unknown story behind a crime. Listen along as she discusses the application of bloodstain pattern analysis and how it fits into the larger puzzle of crime scene investigation in this episode of Just Science. 

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Just Science · Just The Story Behind Bloodstain Pattern Analysis_2020 Case Studies_143

Listen/Download at:

ItunesGooglePlayStitcherSoundcloudSpotify

Guest Bio

Ms. Erin Sims has been employed with the Lincoln Nebraska Police Department for 38 years.   She started her career as a Uniform Police Officer (9yrs), was a Detective/Sergeant (16yrs), and was promoted to Forensic Lab Manager of LPD’s Forensic Identification Unit in December 2008.   She has been one of the supervisors in LPD’s Crime Scene Investigation Unit since its inception in 1997.   She has instructed at the Nebraska Law Enforcement Training Center and taught Advanced Crime Scene Processes at Nebraska Wesleyan Forensic Science Master’s program for 6 years.   Her areas of expertise include Latent Fingerprint processes, Crime Scene Processing, and Bloodstain Pattern Analysis.   Ms. Sims is a Certified IAI Crime Scene Investigator and Bloodstain Pattern Analyst. 

Additional Resources

COMMUNICATING CONCLUSIONS IN BLOODSTAIN PATTERN ANALYSIS

2019 NIJ R&D: JUST RNA AND BLOODSTAINS

SMALL BLOODSTAINS ON TEXTILES – WHAT CAN THEY TELL US?

 

 

<<< back to all episodes

Episode Overview

Criminal investigations often necessitate the application of a multitude of forensic disciplines. While some cases can be solved by a single piece of evidence, most have a myriad of evidence types to forward and investigation. Bloodstains, DNA analysis, latent prints, digital evidence, and reliable police work lead to arrests and can stop a criminal before any more damage is done.  

In our latest season, Case Studies, we sat down with a variety of experts and talked about their most interesting cases. Join us as we discuss bloodstain pattern analysis, photography, serial killers, and much more in this dynamic season of Just Science! 

In the Case Studies season opener, we sat down with Mitchell Pilkington, crime scene manager at Layton City Police Department in Utah, to discuss psychopathy and criminal behavior. 

This episode of Just Science is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence [Award 2016-MU-BX-K110].

Just Science · Just Psychopathy And Criminal Behavior_2020 Case Studies_142

Listen/Download at:

ItunesGooglePlayStitcherSoundcloudSpotify

Guest Bio

Mitchell Pilkington is the Crime Scene Manager for the Layton City Police Department. He began his career in 2001, with an interest in latent print identification, bloodstain pattern analysis and crime scene reconstruction. Mitch is also an Adjunct Professor for the Criminal Justice Department at Weber State University, where he has instructed for over 15 years. His classes cover a variety of topics including forensic science, theories on crime and serial murder.  Mitch’s educational background consists of a M.S. in Criminal Justice from Weber State University. He has provided expert testimony in multiple high-profile cases and is regularly called upon to provide forensic support for other law enforcement agencies. Mitch has also been an independent consultant for local therapists working with victims of violent crime. 

Additional Resources